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Route suggestions

1. ROUTE: SPLIT – SPLIT – 7 days

Route duration: 7 days

Route direction: north

Detailed route descriptions available when clicking on the above image.

  • 1. day Check in Split – Primošten or Šibenska Rogoznica
  • 2. day Primošten (Šibenska Rogoznica) – Žirje – Kornati (island Lavsa)
  • 3. day Kornati (island Lavsa) – Murter (island)
  • 4. day Murter (island) – Skradin
  • 5. day Skradin – Kaprije and/or Kakan (islands – buoys)
  • 6. day Kaprije and Kakan (islands – buoys) – Maslinica (island Šolta) or Veli Drvenik (island)
  • 7. day Maslinica (island Šolta) or Veli Drvenik (island) – Split
  • 8. day Check out Split

Split

Split has a long history, reaching back to the time when Roman Emperor Diocletian opted to build his palace on a peninsula near the famous Roman city of Salona, where he wished to spend his final years. During these 1700 years, the Palace gradually evolved into a city, which continues to entice visitors with its rich tradition, beautiful history, and natural and cultural heritage beauty. Since 1979, Diocletian Palace and the entire historical centre of Split have been listed on the UNESCO World Heritage List, not only because of the Palace’s exceptional preservation, but also because the Palace and its city (or the city and its Palace, if you prefer) continue to live a full life. In this edifice, all historical strata from ancient Rome through the Middle Ages are still visible and alive. A stroll through the ancient city transports you back in time, passing by magnificent examples of ancient architecture such as Peristyle, the middle-aged Romanesque Church, and Gothic Palace, Renaissance portals of noblemen’s houses, Baroque facades, and modern architecture superbly merged in the rich heritage. This division is replicated in Split’s daily life. Locals sit in the same cafes, restaurants, and shops as tourists, creating the sense that they have become a part of the city’s rhythm just by coming in Split. The vegetable and fish markets are the heart of every family’s existence in Split, just as the entire social life of this city of 200 thousand people is reflected on the Riva (waterfront), where every visitor should try to take his coffee alongside the city’s rowdy, temperamental residents. Split is much more than just beautiful architecture. Split is also home to excellent gourmet and wine experiences, as well as numerous cultural events such as film and theater festivals, exhibitions, excellent museums, and concerts. It is a city that offers a diverse range of entertainment options, from numerous clubs and bars to street festivals and events such as the Ultra Europe Festival, which attracts up to 100,000 young people from over a hundred countries each year. Only a few cities of similar size around the world can match Split’s sporting achievements, as it is home to a dozen Olympic medalists as well as other sports medalists. When you’ve had your fill of the city’s hustle and bustle, head to Marjan, the city’s icon, with its forest, jogging routes, mountain climbing and bicycling, recreational terrains, as well as the historic churches where Split’s late people found spiritual serenity. The several beaches with exceptionally clean sea, ranging from the well-known Bavice to the stone isolated oasis’ all surrounding Marjan, are also unique to find in a city the size of Split.

Primošten

Primosten has been rapidly developing since 1960. It is discovered by Zagreb students (from the Observatory) and Esperantists. The “Radua” hotel opened in 1966, followed by the “Zora” and “Slava” hotels in 1968, the “Marina Luica” hotel in 1971, and the marina “Kremik” in 1983. The camp “Adriatic” (Punta Maslina) was created for 3000 campers a little earlier. Primosten is well-known for its sprawling vineyards. On the wall of the United Nations headquarters building in New York, a photograph of one of Primosten’s vines hangs. Vineyards are being examined for inclusion on the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites.  Apart from the vineyards, Primosten is famous because of its annual donkey race. Raduca is the largest beach in Primosten, and Mala Raduca has been named one of Croatia’s ten most beautiful beaches. The statue of Our Lady of Loreto in Primosten, along with the pedestal, stands 17 and 30 meters tall, respectively, and is one-tenth the height of the Gaj hill. The monument is made of concrete, is hollow, and has a mosaic finish made of gold, silver, and stained glass. Architect Aron Varga was in charge of the statue’s final appearance, and a team of experts led by mosaicist Milun Garevi worked on the mosaic. It is the world’s largest such monument.

Rogoznica

Rogoznica lies approximately 34 kilometers from Sibenik, in the southern portion of the Sibenik-Knin County, in a deep bay that is well shielded from the wind. Rogoznica is the most projecting part of the Croatian mainland that penetrates deep into the Adriatic Sea, with a 54-kilometer-long coast and a geographical position that placed it in the heart of the Dalmatian coast. The location of Rogoznica divides the North and South Adriatic, which is underlined by special climatological behaviors in this area, particularly on Rogoznica Cape Planka, where we get a direct collision of climate, wind, and sea currents, the “bura and jugo” conflict. The climate is one of the most important tourism factors, with an average of 2600 hours of sunlight in the Rogoznica area. The mainland of Rogoznica had been populated since 1390. Fearing the Turks, the people relocated to the island in 1518 for safety concerns. Rogoznica’s modern core is made up of the former mainland of Kopaca and the islet of Kopara, which are joined together by an artificial embankment. The city core of Rogoznica is situated on a peninsula with primarily restored historic stone homes, giving the Rogoznica shoreline a true Mediterranean feel. The majority of the island is covered with pine trees, making it excellent for trekking and other recreational activities. This lovely fishing community boasts a deep-draft, naturally protected port that has long provided a safe anchoring for all boaters. Apart from boaters and other tourists, a dense pine forest, a long promenade by the sea, gorgeous beaches, islands and bays, and Dragon Lake in the karst rock all draw visitors today.

Žirje

In the Croatian section of the Adriatic Sea, Zirje is an island and a community. It is located in the Sibenik archipelago, approximately 22 kilometers (14 miles) southwest of Sibenik, making it the archipelago’s most remote permanently populated island. It covers 15.08 km2 and has a population of 103 people. Two limestone ridges make up the island and rich valley lies between them. The island’s vegetation is primarily made up of maquis shrubland, with some farmland in the center areas. Agriculture (grapes, olives, plums, figs, and sour cherries) and fishing are the two main industries. Compared to the other Croatian islands, tourism on Zirje has remained completely undeveloped. The island was fortified in the 12th and 13th centuries by fortifications and walls built on the remains of an earlier Byzantine fortress dating from the 6th century. For over half a century, the island’s southern and south-western areas were off limits to islanders and visitors due to its usage by the Yugoslav Army. The D128 route connects the island’s ferry port with the county capital of Sibenik.

Kornati

The Kornati is a stone maze of eighty-nine islands, islets, and cliffs in the sea. The Mediterranean’s most indented island group. From the air, from the coast… or from the island perspectives to the sea, the view of the Kornati islands is as spectacular – and radically distinct to the eye. Each is worth the time and effort to learn about. The Kornati islands’ dry stone walls are silent, but they always testify to human labor on the sparse land in the stone surrounded by crystal clear sea. Kornati are Mediterranean stone pearls. When the sea reveals rage and might that is lived without regard for the man, this national park is a well-known safe space for sailors…On a total park area of 216.78 km2, there are 89 islands, islets, and reefs. A wonderful indentation comes to life before our eyes, generating diverse sceneries, even through these dry forms. Kornati are a formidable aerial sight. As seen from the vantage points on the islands. Also from the water, as the ship navigates a sea maze at the base of numerous cliffs. The National Park’s islands are separated into two groups: Kornati and Pikerski. They were called after Kornati, the largest of the islands. The archipelago inside the Park has a maximum width of 6 kilometers.

Murter

Murter, in the northwestern section of the island, and Tisno, in the southern part, are the two main communities. The villages of Betina on the northwestern shore and Jezera on the southeastern coast are among the island’s other settlements. The island is located in the northwest corner of the Sibenik archipelago, divided from the mainland by a 20-meter-wide (66-foot-wide) sea canal near Tisno, which is spanned by a small drawbridge. The highest point on the island is Radu Peak, which stands at 125 meters (410 feet) above sea level and encompasses an area of around 18.7 km2 (7.2 sq mi). Deep within the hill, there are old military tunnels. The southwestern shore is characterized by high slopes separated by several sandy bays. There are many rocky beaches on the island, as well as a few sandy ones. Many Christian documents written in Glagolitic/Slavonic rather than Latin have been discovered and preserved here and at the Vatican. The oldest churches on the island include St. Michael’s church, St. Rock’s chapel, and the church of Our Lady of Gradina. Murter’s people have long been involved in agriculture and fishing, and they are well-known for these talents, as well as producing great olive oil. There is a short video documentary about the tourist season; the title of the film is “Post Mortem,” and it is set off the island.

Skradin

Skradin, about fifteen kilometers from Sibenik, is one of Croatia’s oldest cities. It was given its current name for the first time in the 10th century. This area was inhabited in Illyrian times, but the Romans gave it the name Scardona because it was their administrative, traffic, and trade center in Dalmatia. Skradin’s location at the entrance to the Krka National Park makes it one of the most important nautical destinations in the Adriatic, as well as one of Croatia’s most important tourist destinations. Don’t miss a stroll through the Krka National Park, one of Europe’s most magnificent protected areas, and a visit to Bribirska glavica, a significant ancient site known as Croatian Troy. Also, try some indigenous traditional meals that can only be found in Skradin and the neighboring areas of Prokljan Lake.

Kaprije and Kakan

Kaprije is located in the archipelago of Sibenik. The eponymous solitary hamlet on the island has an area of 7.11 km2 (2.75 sq mi) and a population of 189 people. The island is made up of hills separated by transversal and longitudinal valleys, which are covered in grass and scant pine trees. There are vineyards and olive groves there. Agriculture, fishing, and tourism are the main industries. On the island, automobiles are not permitted. The island belonged to noble families from Sibenik in the 14th and 15th centuries and it was populated by refugees from the mainland during Ottoman conquests in the 16th and 17th centuries. A Saint Peter’s church was built on the island around that period. Kakan is an uninhabited island (3.124 km2 (1.206 sq mi)) in Croatia, adjacent to Kaprije.

Maslinica

A lovely pine forest with secluded rocky beaches may be found on the bay’s south side. Maslinica is one of the most beautiful sites in the Adriatic, with an archipelago of seven islets (Polebrnjak, Saskinja, Stipanska, Kamik, Balkun, Rudula, and Grmej) in front of it. The historical, architectural, and environmental values of the old castle and attractive stone buildings are in perfect harmony with the grandeur of the surrounding landscape. The town grew up around the castle built by the Marchi noble family in 1708. Because of the frequent pirate raids, the Marchi brothers asked permission from the Venetian ruler to construct a fortress with a tower to protect the village. The originally modest fishermen’s settlement gradually expanded into a tourist and nautical center of the island after the castle was restored and a marina was built, receiving more and more tourists and repeat guests each year. A 300-year-old castle has been meticulously restored as a heritage hotel with individually designed luxury suites, a helideck, and a fine dining establishment. This is a fantastic tourist destination for those who enjoy nature, unspoiled beaches, and crystal clear waters, and it’s recently become increasingly popular with cyclists, rowers, yachtsmen, and divers, as well as recreational fishing and hunting enthusiasts. Adventuresome travelers will undoubtedly go on a jet-ski ride, while others who prefer to relax in the sun will visit the lovely pebble beach or travel to the neighboring Sipova Bay, where they will be pleasantly delighted to find the island’s sole sandy beach! Kayaking to one of the islets is also a wonderful option – the view of the adjacent bays, Trogir and Drvenik, from the Parish Church of St. Nicholas is pretty rewarding, but the vista of the sun setting behind the islets spread in the water like pearls is guaranteed to leave you speechless! Those who want to stay near the water can take advantage of the biking/hiking track that connects Maslinica with Donje Selo and Srednje Selo. You can also go to the adjacent eula Bay, which has a safe mooring spot due to its geographical location and heavily indented coastline. There, you can sample regional dishes for a one-of-a-kind dining experience. Maslinica got a national award in 2012 for the greatest tourist destination in the Adriatic with fewer than a thousand inhabitants, in recognition of its preserved natural beauty and tourist achievements, and again in 2017 for the best Authentic Coastal Destination!

Drvenik Veli

Drvenik Veliki is a small island off the coast of Dalmatia, about 8 nautical miles from Trogir. It covers a total area of 12.07 square kilometers. The island’s lone community, the near-eponymous village of Drvenik Veliki, has a population of 168 people, and it was first populated in the 15th century. The island is referred to as “Gerona” or “Giruan” in Croatian monuments from the 13th century. The coastline is rocky, with numerous bays and sandy and pebbly beaches. Beautiful bay Solinska is located on the island’s south side, while Krknjasi, also known as Blue Lagoon, is located on the island’s east side. There will be a lovely location to eat there with fresh sea cuisine or whatever else you desire. There are several apartments, a few restaurants, a bakery, and a small store in the ancient village. There are numerous beaches nearby, and the residents are warm and welcoming. Unspoiled nature, lovely beaches, and a tranquil setting are ideal for a quiet and private vacation. You’ll feel as if you’ve traveled back in time. It takes around an hour to travel to Trogir on the local boat line Jadrolinija. Every day, the boat travels from the Trogir and Seget Donji waterfronts towards Drvenik Mali and then returns to Trogir.

General note: This route can be used only in good weather conditions. In bad weather conditions, you can correct the route on your own by using nautical maps and pilot books. In order to avoid heavy sea traffic which usually occurs on the official disembarkation days, we recommend you return to the base on the evening before, until 18:00 hours. If your cruising route leads you towards the Kornati islands, we advise you to take extra precautions in the form of additional food and beverages. The before mentioned island are deserted and therefore marinas and markets are absent from that area.

2. ROUTE: SPLIT – SPLIT – 7 days

Route duration: 7 days

Route direction: south

Detailed route descriptions available when clicking on the above image.

  • 1. day Check in Split – Milna or anchorage Bobovišća (island Brač)
  • 2. day Milna or anchorage Bobovišća – Zlatni Rat (island Brač) – anchorage Tiha (near Starigrad – island Hvar)
  • 3. day Anchorage Tiha (near Starigrad – island Hvar) – Town Vis (island Vis)
  • 4. day Town Vis (island Vis) – Blue Cave (island Biševo) – Veli Budikovac (island)
  • 5. day Veli Budikovac (island) – Pakleni Islands (island Hvar)
  • 6. day Pakleni Islands (island Hvar) – anchorage Bobovišća (island Brač)
  • 7. day anchorage Bobovišća (island Brač) – Split
  • 8. day Check out Split

Split

Split has a long history, reaching back to the time when Roman Emperor Diocletian opted to build his palace on a peninsula near the famous Roman city of Salona, where he wished to spend his final years. During these 1700 years, the Palace gradually evolved into a city, which continues to entice visitors with its rich tradition, beautiful history, and natural and cultural heritage beauty. Since 1979, Diocletian Palace and the entire historical centre of Split have been listed on the UNESCO World Heritage List, not only because of the Palace’s exceptional preservation, but also because the Palace and its city (or the city and its Palace, if you prefer) continue to live a full life. In this edifice, all historical strata from ancient Rome through the Middle Ages are still visible and alive. A stroll through the ancient city transports you back in time, passing by magnificent examples of ancient architecture such as Peristyle, the middle-aged Romanesque Church, and Gothic Palace, Renaissance portals of noblemen’s houses, Baroque facades, and modern architecture superbly merged in the rich heritage. This division is replicated in Split’s daily life. Locals sit in the same cafes, restaurants, and shops as tourists, creating the sense that they have become a part of the city’s rhythm just by coming in Split. The vegetable and fish markets are the heart of every family’s existence in Split, just as the entire social life of this city of 200 thousand people is reflected on the Riva (waterfront), where every visitor should try to take his coffee alongside the city’s rowdy, temperamental residents. Split is much more than just beautiful architecture. Split is also home to excellent gourmet and wine experiences, as well as numerous cultural events such as film and theater festivals, exhibitions, excellent museums, and concerts. It is a city that offers a diverse range of entertainment options, from numerous clubs and bars to street festivals and events such as the Ultra Europe Festival, which attracts up to 100,000 young people from over a hundred countries each year. Only a few cities of similar size around the world can match Split’s sporting achievements, as it is home to a dozen Olympic medalists as well as other sports medalists. When you’ve had your fill of the city’s hustle and bustle, head to Marjan, the city’s icon, with its forest, jogging routes, mountain climbing and bicycling, recreational terrains, as well as the historic churches where Split’s late people found spiritual serenity. The several beaches with exceptionally clean sea, ranging from the well-known Bavice to the stone isolated oasis’ all surrounding Marjan, are also unique to find in a city the size of Split.

Milna

Milna is one of the Dalmatian coast’s most architecturally harmonious instances of Baroque urbanism. It is the great natural harbor on the island of Brac, and it served as a haven for the emperor’s fleet while the Diocletian’s Palace in Split was being built. Milna is located in a bay that divides into two sleeves – Zalo and Pantera. The harbor, which is located on the western side of the island of Bra, offers safety and protection from all winds, making it one of the safest recognized bays for charter boats throughout the summer season. It is a small town in the west of the island, about 18 kilometers from Supetar, the island’s main hub. It became to be the most significant port on the island of Brac, a position it retained for two centuries. Milna, with three state-of-the-art marinas and a bay overlooking the sea strait Splitska vrata, is sure to exceed the expectations of even the most discerning yachtsmen. It has a long and lovely promenade lined with stone houses that are masterpieces of traditional architecture. The town is dominated by a Baroque church with a typical Dalmatian belfry. The inside of the church is filled with outstanding Venetian artworks.

Bobovišče

At the foot of a natural bay that branches into numerous smaller ones, the largest of which is Vicja draga, with which many legends and myths are related, the settlement of Bobovisca grew along the shore as a port to the communities of Bobovisca and Lozisca. Because of its natural location, it has long been a safe refuge for ships fleeing all kind of maritime perils, and it is now an inevitable bay and a safe harbor for many boaters seeking to enjoy the unique beauty of protected nature and clean sea. Numerous archeological findings and items discovered in the sea and on land in the settlement’s vicinity (although much has yet to be studied) attest to Bobovisce’s importance. It is the only Brac community without its own church, and the fortified castle (constructed in the Renaissance-Baroque style) of the Gligo family (Marincevic) dominates the bay. Bobovisca is known as the “poet’s port” because it is the home of the Nazor family, which includes one of Croatia’s best poets and writers, Vladimir Nazor. The acropolis with its concrete three-pillar, which the poet dedicated to his sisters and named “Three Sisters,” is the symbolic monument. A statue of Vladimir Nazor stands at the bay’s bottom. Because of its natural assets, it is now a popular climbing destination with the potential to grow active sports and adventure tourism alongside nautical tourism.

Zlatni rat (Bol)

Zlatni rat beach is one of the most beautiful beaches in the Mediterranean, and it is also one of the most unique beaches in the world due to its unique shape. Many world-famous business and travel magazines, including the New York Times, National Geographic, and Insider Travel, have featured it as one of the world’s most spectacular beaches in their articles. The elegance and allure of the Zlatni rat have made it a symbol of both the town of Bol and Croatia, and the Croatian government has designated it as a geomorphological monument. But it’s not just the shape that makes it so lovely and one-of-a-kind. It is surrounded by a crystal clear sea that changes color from turquoise to dark blue in just 10 to 20 meters, and it is bordered by decades-old pine trees that were planted by residents to provide natural shade. The beach is less than 2 kilometers from Bol and is connected to a wonderful promenade shaded by pine trees, along which several more little beaches may be found. This intriguing 500-meter-long pebble beach has an unusual shape, like a little peninsula that reaches into the sea on both sides with about 900 meters of beach. The beach spans over 20.000 square meters and can accommodate over 10.000 people comfortably. The beach’s shape and position change depending on the wind, tide, and current, and the tip of the beach occasionally rotates so much that it forms a small pool. Mornings are usually windless, and the wind blows every afternoon, but one side of the beach always has calm water, making it ideal for families with small children.

Stari Grad

Stari Grad is Croatia’s oldest town. Greek philoshoper Aristotel was born in Trakia in the same year that Greeks from the island of Paros in the Agean Sea landed on the island of Hvar and christened it Pharos. It is the island of Hvar’s historical heart. The town is set in a landscape where the vivid blue of the sea meets the green of the famous Pharos plain, which is dotted with vineyards and olive trees. The water gave protection and the crops provided nutrition. Both the fields and the water now contribute an appealing element to the island, where modern vacation sites have grown entwined with the town’s and island’s antiquities. Because of its central location on Hvar Island, Stari Grad has long been a safe haven for sailors, who have been greeted by town residents on the port promenade. The bay of Stari Grad is still frequented by most boat passengers going through middle Dalmatia. The village is surrounded by pine trees and is kept cool by summer breezes (maestral). It is one of the few Dalmatian sites where the air is pure and the sleep is soothing on hot summer days. The Town’s thousand-year history has left many monuments in the city’s urban framework.

Vis

The town of Vis is situated at the bottom of a well-protected harbour in the north-eastern corner of the island of Vis. It grew out of the old communities of Kut and Luka, which merged in the 16th century when the church Gospa od Spilica was built. With the demilitarisation of the island at the start of the Croatian war (1991-1995), tourism on Vis began to grow considerably. So it’s just been 15 years since the island and its town were both available to tourists. The Yugoslav Army’s stay is documented by the remains of military objects in the northwest and northeast parts of the Bay of Vis. Many visitors, particularly yachtsmen, are flocking to Vis in increasing numbers. Every moment, there are changes in lifestyle, but Vis has retained the old, irresistible Mediterranean charm and a life free of stress and trouble. The fortresses and stony piles attest to Vis’s thousand-year-old settlement, and the remains of a theatre built into the foundations of the Franciscan monastery on the peninsula Prirovo, antique therms, and the Hellenistic cemetery attest to Vis’s status as one of Croatia’s oldest urban centers. The growth of the economic activities of the people of Vis has been determined by natural conditions and tradition. Agriculture has long been the mainstay of the economy due to the abundance of cultivable and high-quality land, particularly in the regions surrounding Vis. Since antiquity, wine-growing has been the most important industry of the locals, as the writer Agatarhid explained, “how the grape from Issa, an island in the Adriatic sea, compares to others better.” The vast fishing grounds in this region of the Adriatic Sea, on the other hand, have influenced the development of fishing. Various sports activities are available in the town. A well-equipped sport and recreation center with four tennis courts, a basketball court, and a football field is available. In Vis, you can also join a sailing, cricket, or paragliding club. Outside of town, there are two diving centers where you can dive with other divers. Mountain climbing and bicycling are also options.

Blue Cave

The Blue Cave is a waterlogged sea cave in the Croatian Adriatic, located in a little bay named Balun (Ball in local dialect) on the east side of the island of Bisevo, about 4.5 nautical miles (8.3 kilometers) from Komiza. It is located 5 kilometers south-west of the island of Vis in the middle Dalmatian archipelago. The grotto is one of the Adriatic’s most well-known natural beauty places and a renowned show cave due to the shimmering blue light that shows at particular times of day. Because there was only one natural entrance below sea level, the cave was once only accessible by diving. In 1884, an artificial entrance large enough for small boats was erected based on his concept. The cave’s natural entrance, positioned on its southern side, is supposed to resemble a grotto’s vaulted ceiling. The sunlight enters the cave through this submarine-like entrance in the cave roof, creating an iridescent blue glowing effect all throughout the cave. In addition, a stone bar linking two cave walls is plainly visible just below the waterline in both above-water and underwater shots. The best time to visit the cave is between 11 a.m. and 12 p.m., depending on the season. The sunshine reflects through the water flowing from the cave’s white bottom, bathing the grotto in aquamarine light and making everything in the water appear silver. The cave was formed by the sea’s wave action, which eroded the limestone rock that makes up the entire island of Bievo. The cave itself is 24 meters long, 10–12 meters deep, and up to 15 meters high, with a 1.5-meter-high and 2.5-meter-wide entrance.

Veliki Budikovac

Budikovac, an uninhabited island on the southeast side of Vis, just opposite the bay Bargujac, is presumably recognized to those who are familiar with Vis and its wonders. The only way to get to the two beaches worth visiting is via boat. Those who have decided to visit Vis will find a full selection of transportation options to the gorgeous island’s isolated beaches; all they need to do is go to the waterfront or the local tourism board. Budikovac is the name of the beach, which attracts visitors from all over the world year after year, and Perna, which is probably less well-known but equally gorgeous, is located in the northeast.

Pakleni otoci

The Paklinski islands are ‘anchored’ on the popular route between Split and Vis, and their 21 nautically appealing islands, islets, and cliffs that appear to be attached to the town of Hvar by an umbilical cord ensure a unique sea experience. Paklina is a sort of pine resin used in shipbuilding, and the islands are named after it. St. Clement is by far the largest island in this ‘hellishly’ magnificent sea sanctuary. Its southern sides are ornamented with various turquoise bays, while the ACI marina Palmiana provides a safe refuge on the north side of the island, and branching island trails connect them. Smaller islets can be found on both sides of the island, with Marinkovac and Jerolim to the east and Marinkovac and Jerolim to the west. The Paklinski islands, in particular, provide sailors with the widest choice of options. Whether you prefer tight ties or anchoring, wild nightlife or the sound of crickets, popular gastronomic destinations or family households, or simply want to raise your heart rate while exploring these green oases on your own strength, the Paklinski islands unquestionably ‘hide’ a paradise for anyone who enjoys yachting! ACI Marina Palmizana provides safe protection in all weather situations, particularly in the northwestern half of the marina. It is popular with boaters since it is ideally incorporated into the natural environment while also providing all of the required amenities of civilization, such as restrooms, a market, a restaurant, fast food, an ATM, and free Wi-Fi. This seasonally open port is often bustling, especially on days when large fleets of youthful boats visit. It’s a great place to start exploring the entire island.

Bobovišče

At the foot of a natural bay that branches into numerous smaller ones, the largest of which is Vicja draga, with which many legends and myths are related, the settlement of Bobovisca grew along the shore as a port to the communities of Bobovisca and Lozisca. Because of its natural location, it has long been a safe refuge for ships fleeing all kind of maritime perils, and it is now an inevitable bay and a safe harbor for many boaters seeking to enjoy the unique beauty of protected nature and clean sea. Numerous archeological findings and items discovered in the sea and on land in the settlement’s vicinity (although much has yet to be studied) attest to Bobovisce’s importance. It is the only Brac community without its own church, and the fortified castle (constructed in the Renaissance-Baroque style) of the Gligo family (Marincevic) dominates the bay. Bobovisca is known as the “poet’s port” because it is the home of the Nazor family, which includes one of Croatia’s best poets and writers, Vladimir Nazor. The acropolis with its concrete three-pillar, which the poet dedicated to his sisters and named “Three Sisters,” is the symbolic monument. A statue of Vladimir Nazor stands at the bay’s bottom. Because of its natural assets, it is now a popular climbing destination with the potential to grow active sports and adventure tourism alongside nautical tourism.

General note: This route can be used only in good weather conditions. In bad weather conditions, you can correct the route on your own by using nautical maps and pilot books. In order to avoid heavy sea traffic which usually occurs on the official disembarkation days, we recommend you return to the base on the evening before, until 18:00 hours. If your cruising route leads you towards the Kornati islands, we advise you to take extra precautions in the form of additional food and beverages. The before mentioned island are deserted and therefore marinas and markets are absent from that area.

3. ROUTE: SPLIT – SPLIT – 7 days

Route duration: 7 days

Route direction: south

Detailed route descriptions available when clicking on the above image.

  • 1. day Check in Split – Milna or anchorage Bobovišća (island Brač)
  • 2. day Milna or anchorage Bobovišća – The Green Cave (island Ravnik) – Veli Budikovac (island)
  • 3. day Veli Budikovac (island) – Lumbarda (island Korčula)
  • 4. day Lumbarda (island Korčula) – Šćedro (island) – Aci Marina Hvar (Palmižana – island Hvar)
  • 5. day Aci Marina Hvar (Palmižana) – anchorage Tiha (near Starigrad – island Hvar)
  • 6. day anchorage Tiha (near Starigrad – island Hvar) – Zlatni Rat (island Brač) – Uvala Lučice (island Brač)
  • 7. day Uvala Lučice (island Brač) – Split
  • 8. day Check out Split

Split

Split has a long history, reaching back to the time when Roman Emperor Diocletian opted to build his palace on a peninsula near the famous Roman city of Salona, where he wished to spend his final years. During these 1700 years, the Palace gradually evolved into a city, which continues to entice visitors with its rich tradition, beautiful history, and natural and cultural heritage beauty. Since 1979, Diocletian Palace and the entire historical centre of Split have been listed on the UNESCO World Heritage List, not only because of the Palace’s exceptional preservation, but also because the Palace and its city (or the city and its Palace, if you prefer) continue to live a full life. In this edifice, all historical strata from ancient Rome through the Middle Ages are still visible and alive. A stroll through the ancient city transports you back in time, passing by magnificent examples of ancient architecture such as Peristyle, the middle-aged Romanesque Church, and Gothic Palace, Renaissance portals of noblemen’s houses, Baroque facades, and modern architecture superbly merged in the rich heritage. This division is replicated in Split’s daily life. Locals sit in the same cafes, restaurants, and shops as tourists, creating the sense that they have become a part of the city’s rhythm just by coming in Split. The vegetable and fish markets are the heart of every family’s existence in Split, just as the entire social life of this city of 200 thousand people is reflected on the Riva (waterfront), where every visitor should try to take his coffee alongside the city’s rowdy, temperamental residents. Split is much more than just beautiful architecture. Split is also home to excellent gourmet and wine experiences, as well as numerous cultural events such as film and theater festivals, exhibitions, excellent museums, and concerts. It is a city that offers a diverse range of entertainment options, from numerous clubs and bars to street festivals and events such as the Ultra Europe Festival, which attracts up to 100,000 young people from over a hundred countries each year. Only a few cities of similar size around the world can match Split’s sporting achievements, as it is home to a dozen Olympic medalists as well as other sports medalists. When you’ve had your fill of the city’s hustle and bustle, head to Marjan, the city’s icon, with its forest, jogging routes, mountain climbing and bicycling, recreational terrains, as well as the historic churches where Split’s late people found spiritual serenity. The several beaches with exceptionally clean sea, ranging from the well-known Bavice to the stone isolated oasis’ all surrounding Marjan, are also unique to find in a city the size of Split.

Milna

Milna is one of the Dalmatian coast’s most architecturally harmonious instances of Baroque urbanism. It is the great natural harbor on the island of Brac, and it served as a haven for the emperor’s fleet while the Diocletian’s Palace in Split was being built. Milna is located in a bay that divides into two sleeves – Zalo and Pantera. The harbor, which is located on the western side of the island of Bra, offers safety and protection from all winds, making it one of the safest recognized bays for charter boats throughout the summer season. It is a small town in the west of the island, about 18 kilometers from Supetar, the island’s main hub. It became to be the most significant port on the island of Brac, a position it retained for two centuries. Milna, with three state-of-the-art marinas and a bay overlooking the sea strait Splitska vrata, is sure to exceed the expectations of even the most discerning yachtsmen. It has a long and lovely promenade lined with stone houses that are masterpieces of traditional architecture. The town is dominated by a Baroque church with a typical Dalmatian belfry. The inside of the church is filled with outstanding Venetian artworks.

Bobovišče

At the foot of a natural bay that branches into numerous smaller ones, the largest of which is Vicja draga, with which many legends and myths are related, the settlement of Bobovisca grew along the shore as a port to the communities of Bobovisca and Lozisca. Because of its natural location, it has long been a safe refuge for ships fleeing all kind of maritime perils, and it is now an inevitable bay and a safe harbor for many boaters seeking to enjoy the unique beauty of protected nature and clean sea. Numerous archeological findings and items discovered in the sea and on land in the settlement’s vicinity (although much has yet to be studied) attest to Bobovisce’s importance. It is the only Brac community without its own church, and the fortified castle (constructed in the Renaissance-Baroque style) of the Gligo family (Marincevic) dominates the bay. Bobovisca is known as the “poet’s port” because it is the home of the Nazor family, which includes one of Croatia’s best poets and writers, Vladimir Nazor. The acropolis with its concrete three-pillar, which the poet dedicated to his sisters and named “Three Sisters,” is the symbolic monument. A statue of Vladimir Nazor stands at the bay’s bottom. Because of its natural assets, it is now a popular climbing destination with the potential to grow active sports and adventure tourism alongside nautical tourism.

Green cave

The Green Cave sits on the south-west side of Ravnik, a small, deserted island. It’s only a short distance from Vis Island, which is famous for providing a taste of the Mediterranean as it once was after being closed to the public for 40 years while serving as a major military installation. Because the Green Cave is frequently visited as part of private boat tours, you can also arrange stops at other locations. In the Green Cave, you’ll be able to swim and snorkel while taking in the beautiful emerald glow. You’ll be able to view that beam of light that reflects from the sea floor creating a stunning scene while submerged in this underwater realm, using snorkeling gear that’s normally provided on a tour. You may take beautiful images to share with your family and friends back home if you bring an underwater camera. The visibility is excellent, with schools of colorful fish frequently visible. You might even be able to plunge from the cave’s top into the alluring water below if you’re feeling very daring.

Veliki Budikovac

Budikovac, an uninhabited island on the southeast side of Vis, just opposite the bay Bargujac, is presumably recognized to those who are familiar with Vis and its wonders. The only way to get to the two beaches worth visiting is via boat. Those who have decided to visit Vis will find a full selection of transportation options to the gorgeous island’s isolated beaches; all they need to do is go to the waterfront or the local tourism board. Budikovac is the name of the beach, which attracts visitors from all over the world year after year, and Perna, which is probably less well-known but equally gorgeous, is located in the northeast.

Šćedro

Scedro is an Adriatic Sea island with an area of 8.36 km2 located 2.7 km (1.7 mi) off the south coast of the Croatian island of Hvar, opposite the municipality of Zavala. Because the island has two deep, well-protected coves, the name originates from Stedri, which means generous in old Slavonic. Scdro’s Latin name was Tauris, from which the Italian Tauricola or Torcola was derived. The island was communal property and reserved for use as a pasture, according to the Hvar Statute of 1331. The island is exceptionally productive, has a gentler climate than Hvar, and was even used to cultivate grain thanks to night dew. In the Bay of Mostir (1465), a Dominican monastery was founded, together with a sailor’s hospice, and was abandoned in the 18th century. Stare Stine has an old quarry, and gypsum from the island was used in the Hvar cathedral’s Baroque chapels. During the summer, the island is home to about 30 people. Except for restaurants and other tourist services during the summer season, the historic settlements of Mostir and Nastane are now mostly deserted.

Hvar

Hvar is an old city with a rich history on the same-named Croatian Adriatic Sea island. Hvar is proud to have the most sunny hours of any Adriatic Sea island. Many people describe Hvar as a lovely town because of its architecture, beautiful nature, and good weather. Hvar has a majestic piazza, widely regarded as the most beautiful of its kind in Dalmatia, dominated by St. Stephen’s Cathedral and bordered by Groda’s palaces and the cascading stone-built houses of Burag. Overall, Hvar straightaway presents itself as a monument, a jewel hidden by time. You can see the Fortica (Spanjola) fortress, the cathedral of Hvar, the Hvar theatre (founded in 1612), the arsenal, and the Franciscan monastery. Also, the nightlife in Hvar is what draws a large number of young people from all over the world.

Stari Grad

Stari Grad is Croatia’s oldest town. Greek philoshoper Aristotel was born in Trakia in the same year that Greeks from the island of Paros in the Agean Sea landed on the island of Hvar and christened it Pharos. It is the island of Hvar’s historical heart. The town is set in a landscape where the vivid blue of the sea meets the green of the famous Pharos plain, which is dotted with vineyards and olive trees. The water gave protection and the crops provided nutrition. Both the fields and the water now contribute an appealing element to the island, where modern vacation sites have grown entwined with the town’s and island’s antiquities. Because of its central location on Hvar Island, Stari Grad has long been a safe haven for sailors, who have been greeted by town residents on the port promenade. The bay of Stari Grad is still frequented by most boat passengers going through middle Dalmatia. The village is surrounded by pine trees and is kept cool by summer breezes (maestral). It is one of the few Dalmatian sites where the air is pure and the sleep is soothing on hot summer days. The Town’s thousand-year history has left many monuments in the city’s urban framework.

Zlatni rat (Bol)

Zlatni rat beach is one of the most beautiful beaches in the Mediterranean, and it is also one of the most unique beaches in the world due to its unique shape. Many world-famous business and travel magazines, including the New York Times, National Geographic, and Insider Travel, have featured it as one of the world’s most spectacular beaches in their articles. The elegance and allure of the Zlatni rat have made it a symbol of both the town of Bol and Croatia, and the Croatian government has designated it as a geomorphological monument. But it’s not just the shape that makes it so lovely and one-of-a-kind. It is surrounded by a crystal clear sea that changes color from turquoise to dark blue in just 10 to 20 meters, and it is bordered by decades-old pine trees that were planted by residents to provide natural shade. The beach is less than 2 kilometers from Bol and is connected to a wonderful promenade shaded by pine trees, along which several more little beaches may be found. This intriguing 500-meter-long pebble beach has an unusual shape, like a little peninsula that reaches into the sea on both sides with about 900 meters of beach. The beach spans over 20.000 square meters and can accommodate over 10.000 people comfortably. The beach’s shape and position change depending on the wind, tide, and current, and the tip of the beach occasionally rotates so much that it forms a small pool. Mornings are usually windless, and the wind blows every afternoon, but one side of the beach always has calm water, making it ideal for families with small children.

Lučica

Lucice Bay is a favorite with sailors that cruise this stretch of the Brac coastline. The cove is divided into five sections, each of which provides enough wind protection. Aside from sailors, the cove is attractive to divers due to a cave in the western section of the lagoon. The sea in Lucice has an incredible sky-blue color that simply encourages guests to swim along the sandy floor and lush pine trees. Numerous summer cottages, apartments, and rooms are available for rent. Nearby restaurants serve Dalmatian specialties as well as a wide variety of fresh fish.

General note: This route can be used only in good weather conditions. In bad weather conditions, you can correct the route on your own by using nautical maps and pilot books. In order to avoid heavy sea traffic which usually occurs on the official disembarkation days, we recommend you return to the base on the evening before, until 18:00 hours.

4. ROUTE: SPLIT – SPLIT – 7 days

Route duration: 7 days

Route direction: south

Detailed route descriptions available when clicking on the above image.

  • 1. day Check in Split – Maslinica (Island Šolta)
  • 2. day Maslinica (Island Šolta) – Komiža (island Vis)
  • 3. day Komiža (island Vis) – Aci Marina Hvar (Palmižana – island Hvar)
  • 4. day Aci Marina Hvar (Palmižana – island Hvar) – anchorage Tiha (near Starigrad – island Hvar)
  • 5. day anchorage Tiha (near Starigrad – island Hvar) – Zlatni Rat (island Brač) – Uvala Luke (island Brač – north)
  • 6. day Uvala Luke (island Brač – north) – Milna or anchorage Bobovišća (island Brač)
  • 7. day Milna or anchorage Bobovišća (island Brač) – Split
  • 8. day Check out Split

Split

Split has a long history, reaching back to the time when Roman Emperor Diocletian opted to build his palace on a peninsula near the famous Roman city of Salona, where he wished to spend his final years. During these 1700 years, the Palace gradually evolved into a city, which continues to entice visitors with its rich tradition, beautiful history, and natural and cultural heritage beauty. Since 1979, Diocletian Palace and the entire historical centre of Split have been listed on the UNESCO World Heritage List, not only because of the Palace’s exceptional preservation, but also because the Palace and its city (or the city and its Palace, if you prefer) continue to live a full life. In this edifice, all historical strata from ancient Rome through the Middle Ages are still visible and alive. A stroll through the ancient city transports you back in time, passing by magnificent examples of ancient architecture such as Peristyle, the middle-aged Romanesque Church, and Gothic Palace, Renaissance portals of noblemen’s houses, Baroque facades, and modern architecture superbly merged in the rich heritage. This division is replicated in Split’s daily life. Locals sit in the same cafes, restaurants, and shops as tourists, creating the sense that they have become a part of the city’s rhythm just by coming in Split. The vegetable and fish markets are the heart of every family’s existence in Split, just as the entire social life of this city of 200 thousand people is reflected on the Riva (waterfront), where every visitor should try to take his coffee alongside the city’s rowdy, temperamental residents. Split is much more than just beautiful architecture. Split is also home to excellent gourmet and wine experiences, as well as numerous cultural events such as film and theater festivals, exhibitions, excellent museums, and concerts. It is a city that offers a diverse range of entertainment options, from numerous clubs and bars to street festivals and events such as the Ultra Europe Festival, which attracts up to 100,000 young people from over a hundred countries each year. Only a few cities of similar size around the world can match Split’s sporting achievements, as it is home to a dozen Olympic medalists as well as other sports medalists. When you’ve had your fill of the city’s hustle and bustle, head to Marjan, the city’s icon, with its forest, jogging routes, mountain climbing and bicycling, recreational terrains, as well as the historic churches where Split’s late people found spiritual serenity. The several beaches with exceptionally clean sea, ranging from the well-known Bavice to the stone isolated oasis’ all surrounding Marjan, are also unique to find in a city the size of Split.

Komiža

Komiza is situated in a deep harbor on the western side of the island Vis, beneath the 600 meter high Hum mountain (1677 inhabitants according to the census from 2001). It is a typical Mediterranean community, with magnificent beaches and tiny streets and buildings crammed together around the harbor, attracting tourists. The moderate Mediterranean climate makes Komiza a lovely place to visit even in the winter. Gusarica, Nova posta, and Velo zalo are three gravel beaches with drinking water along the entire east shore of the Bay of Komiza. Komiza has always been proud of its fishing heritage, which is preserved in the Fisherman’s Museum, which is housed in the old Venetian tower on the promenade (riva), Croatia’s only one. In it are presented classic fishing tools. At the world exposition EXPO 1998 in Lisbon, a replica of the Komiza fishing boat gajeta falkusa highlighted Croatian maritime history. Every year on December 6th, during the feast of St. Nikola, the patron saint of travelers, seamen, and fishermen, a sacrificial boat is burned in front of the parish church of St. Nikola. Local culinary specialties (domestic bread-komiska pogaca, baked meals, grilled pilchards, beans and noodles in a fish stew-brodetto) are served alongside domestic wine. Traditional recipes would be impossible to envisage without these marine fruits. Parachute-sailing, horseback riding, nature walks, and diving are all options for adventurous vacationers. In the vicinity of Vis, there are 20 spots in the depths of the sea with sunken planes, sailing ships, submarines, and warships. Visit the Fisherman’s Museum and the music-dramatic manifestations of Komiza’s Cultural Summer, where you can hear klapa-songs from the taverns/konobas, if you’re interested in culture and enjoyment.

Hvar

Hvar is an old city with a rich history on the same-named Croatian Adriatic Sea island. Hvar is proud to have the most sunny hours of any Adriatic Sea island. Many people describe Hvar as a lovely town because of its architecture, beautiful nature, and good weather. Hvar has a majestic piazza, widely regarded as the most beautiful of its kind in Dalmatia, dominated by St. Stephen’s Cathedral and bordered by Groda’s palaces and the cascading stone-built houses of Burag. Overall, Hvar straightaway presents itself as a monument, a jewel hidden by time. You can see the Fortica (Spanjola) fortress, the cathedral of Hvar, the Hvar theatre (founded in 1612), the arsenal, and the Franciscan monastery. Also, the nightlife in Hvar is what draws a large number of young people from all over the world.

Stari Grad

Stari Grad is Croatia’s oldest town. Greek philoshoper Aristotel was born in Trakia in the same year that Greeks from the island of Paros in the Agean Sea landed on the island of Hvar and christened it Pharos. It is the island of Hvar’s historical heart. The town is set in a landscape where the vivid blue of the sea meets the green of the famous Pharos plain, which is dotted with vineyards and olive trees. The water gave protection and the crops provided nutrition. Both the fields and the water now contribute an appealing element to the island, where modern vacation sites have grown entwined with the town’s and island’s antiquities. Because of its central location on Hvar Island, Stari Grad has long been a safe haven for sailors, who have been greeted by town residents on the port promenade. The bay of Stari Grad is still frequented by most boat passengers going through middle Dalmatia. The village is surrounded by pine trees and is kept cool by summer breezes (maestral). It is one of the few Dalmatian sites where the air is pure and the sleep is soothing on hot summer days. The Town’s thousand-year history has left many monuments in the city’s urban framework.

Zlatni rat (Bol)

Zlatni rat beach is one of the most beautiful beaches in the Mediterranean, and it is also one of the most unique beaches in the world due to its unique shape. Many world-famous business and travel magazines, including the New York Times, National Geographic, and Insider Travel, have featured it as one of the world’s most spectacular beaches in their articles. The elegance and allure of the Zlatni rat have made it a symbol of both the town of Bol and Croatia, and the Croatian government has designated it as a geomorphological monument. But it’s not just the shape that makes it so lovely and one-of-a-kind. It is surrounded by a crystal clear sea that changes color from turquoise to dark blue in just 10 to 20 meters, and it is bordered by decades-old pine trees that were planted by residents to provide natural shade. The beach is less than 2 kilometers from Bol and is connected to a wonderful promenade shaded by pine trees, along which several more little beaches may be found. This intriguing 500-meter-long pebble beach has an unusual shape, like a little peninsula that reaches into the sea on both sides with about 900 meters of beach. The beach spans over 20.000 square meters and can accommodate over 10.000 people comfortably. The beach’s shape and position change depending on the wind, tide, and current, and the tip of the beach occasionally rotates so much that it forms a small pool. Mornings are usually windless, and the wind blows every afternoon, but one side of the beach always has calm water, making it ideal for families with small children.

Milna

Milna is one of the Dalmatian coast’s most architecturally harmonious instances of Baroque urbanism. It is the great natural harbor on the island of Brac, and it served as a haven for the emperor’s fleet while the Diocletian’s Palace in Split was being built. Milna is located in a bay that divides into two sleeves – Zalo and Pantera. The harbor, which is located on the western side of the island of Bra, offers safety and protection from all winds, making it one of the safest recognized bays for charter boats throughout the summer season. It is a small town in the west of the island, about 18 kilometers from Supetar, the island’s main hub. It became to be the most significant port on the island of Brac, a position it retained for two centuries. Milna, with three state-of-the-art marinas and a bay overlooking the sea strait Splitska vrata, is sure to exceed the expectations of even the most discerning yachtsmen. It has a long and lovely promenade lined with stone houses that are masterpieces of traditional architecture. The town is dominated by a Baroque church with a typical Dalmatian belfry. The inside of the church is filled with outstanding Venetian artworks.

Bobovišče

At the foot of a natural bay that branches into numerous smaller ones, the largest of which is Vicja draga, with which many legends and myths are related, the settlement of Bobovisca grew along the shore as a port to the communities of Bobovisca and Lozisca. Because of its natural location, it has long been a safe refuge for ships fleeing all kind of maritime perils, and it is now an inevitable bay and a safe harbor for many boaters seeking to enjoy the unique beauty of protected nature and clean sea. Numerous archeological findings and items discovered in the sea and on land in the settlement’s vicinity (although much has yet to be studied) attest to Bobovisce’s importance. It is the only Brac community without its own church, and the fortified castle (constructed in the Renaissance-Baroque style) of the Gligo family (Marincevic) dominates the bay. Bobovisca is known as the “poet’s port” because it is the home of the Nazor family, which includes one of Croatia’s best poets and writers, Vladimir Nazor. The acropolis with its concrete three-pillar, which the poet dedicated to his sisters and named “Three Sisters,” is the symbolic monument. A statue of Vladimir Nazor stands at the bay’s bottom. Because of its natural assets, it is now a popular climbing destination with the potential to grow active sports and adventure tourism alongside nautical tourism.

General note: This route can be used only in good weather conditions. In bad weather conditions, you can correct the route on your own by using nautical maps and pilot books. In order to avoid heavy sea traffic which usually occurs on the official disembarkation days, we recommend you return to the base on the evening before, until 18:00 hours.

5. ROUTE: SPLIT – SPLIT – 14 days

Route duration: 14 days

Route direction: north

Detailed route descriptions available when clicking on the above image.

  • 1. day Check in Split – Šešula bay (island Šolta)
  • 2. day Šešula bay (island Šolta) – Šibenska Rogoznica
  • 3. day Šibenska Rogoznica – Žirje (island)
  • 4. day Žirje (island) – Kornati (island Lavsa)
  • 5. day Kornati (island Lavsa) – Telašćica (Nature Park – Dugi island)
  • 6. day Telašćica (Nature Park – Dugi island) – Murter (island)
  • 7. day Murter (island) – Skradin (town)
  • 8. day Skradin (town) – Primošten or Šibenska Rogoznica
  • 9. day Primošten or Šibenska Rogoznica – Komiža (island Vis)
  • 10. day Komiža (island Vis) – Biševo (island) – Town Vis or Stončica bay (island Vis)
  • 11. day Town Vis or Stončica bay (island Vis) – Aci Marina Hvar (Palmižana – island Hvar)
  • 12. day Aci Marina Hvar (Palmižana – island Hvar) – anchorage Tiha (near Starigrad – island Hvar)
  • 13. day anchorage Tiha (island Hvar) – Zlatni Rat (island Brač) – Uvala Lučice (island Brač – south)
  • 14. day Uvala Lučice (island Brač – south) – Split
  • 15. day Check out Split

Split

Split has a long history, reaching back to the time when Roman Emperor Diocletian opted to build his palace on a peninsula near the famous Roman city of Salona, where he wished to spend his final years. During these 1700 years, the Palace gradually evolved into a city, which continues to entice visitors with its rich tradition, beautiful history, and natural and cultural heritage beauty. Since 1979, Diocletian Palace and the entire historical centre of Split have been listed on the UNESCO World Heritage List, not only because of the Palace’s exceptional preservation, but also because the Palace and its city (or the city and its Palace, if you prefer) continue to live a full life. In this edifice, all historical strata from ancient Rome through the Middle Ages are still visible and alive. A stroll through the ancient city transports you back in time, passing by magnificent examples of ancient architecture such as Peristyle, the middle-aged Romanesque Church, and Gothic Palace, Renaissance portals of noblemen’s houses, Baroque facades, and modern architecture superbly merged in the rich heritage. This division is replicated in Split’s daily life. Locals sit in the same cafes, restaurants, and shops as tourists, creating the sense that they have become a part of the city’s rhythm just by coming in Split. The vegetable and fish markets are the heart of every family’s existence in Split, just as the entire social life of this city of 200 thousand people is reflected on the Riva (waterfront), where every visitor should try to take his coffee alongside the city’s rowdy, temperamental residents. Split is much more than just beautiful architecture. Split is also home to excellent gourmet and wine experiences, as well as numerous cultural events such as film and theater festivals, exhibitions, excellent museums, and concerts. It is a city that offers a diverse range of entertainment options, from numerous clubs and bars to street festivals and events such as the Ultra Europe Festival, which attracts up to 100,000 young people from over a hundred countries each year. Only a few cities of similar size around the world can match Split’s sporting achievements, as it is home to a dozen Olympic medalists as well as other sports medalists. When you’ve had your fill of the city’s hustle and bustle, head to Marjan, the city’s icon, with its forest, jogging routes, mountain climbing and bicycling, recreational terrains, as well as the historic churches where Split’s late people found spiritual serenity. The several beaches with exceptionally clean sea, ranging from the well-known Bavice to the stone isolated oasis’ all surrounding Marjan, are also unique to find in a city the size of Split.

Šešula bay

On the island of Solta, the Sesula bay is located south of Maslinica. It is one of the most visited bays on the western half of the island of Solta because of its protected position from all winds. This little bay is a boater’s delight, and the lovely scenery, clear water, and attractive pebble beaches add to the appeal. The harbor of Sesula is also accessible from the land, and it takes 15 minutes to walk from Maslinica. You can get there by car, but the entrance route is a macadam road. As a result, we recommend visiting this bay by boat from the sea or by bicycle from the land.

Rogoznica

Rogoznica lies approximately 34 kilometers from Sibenik, in the southern portion of the Sibenik-Knin County, in a deep bay that is well shielded from the wind. Rogoznica is the most projecting part of the Croatian mainland that penetrates deep into the Adriatic Sea, with a 54-kilometer-long coast and a geographical position that placed it in the heart of the Dalmatian coast. The location of Rogoznica divides the North and South Adriatic, which is underlined by special climatological behaviors in this area, particularly on Rogoznica Cape Planka, where we get a direct collision of climate, wind, and sea currents, the “bura and jugo” conflict. The climate is one of the most important tourism factors, with an average of 2600 hours of sunlight in the Rogoznica area. The mainland of Rogoznica had been populated since 1390. Fearing the Turks, the people relocated to the island in 1518 for safety concerns. Rogoznica’s modern core is made up of the former mainland of Kopaca and the islet of Kopara, which are joined together by an artificial embankment. The city core of Rogoznica is situated on a peninsula with primarily restored historic stone homes, giving the Rogoznica shoreline a true Mediterranean feel. The majority of the island is covered with pine trees, making it excellent for trekking and other recreational activities. This lovely fishing community boasts a deep-draft, naturally protected port that has long provided a safe anchoring for all boaters. Apart from boaters and other tourists, a dense pine forest, a long promenade by the sea, gorgeous beaches, islands and bays, and Dragon Lake in the karst rock all draw visitors today.

Žirje

In the Croatian section of the Adriatic Sea, Zirje is an island and a community. It is located in the Sibenik archipelago, approximately 22 kilometers (14 miles) southwest of Sibenik, making it the archipelago’s most remote permanently populated island. It covers 15.08 km2 and has a population of 103 people. Two limestone ridges make up the island and rich valley lies between them. The island’s vegetation is primarily made up of maquis shrubland, with some farmland in the center areas. Agriculture (grapes, olives, plums, figs, and sour cherries) and fishing are the two main industries. Compared to the other Croatian islands, tourism on Zirje has remained completely undeveloped. The island was fortified in the 12th and 13th centuries by fortifications and walls built on the remains of an earlier Byzantine fortress dating from the 6th century. For over half a century, the island’s southern and south-western areas were off limits to islanders and visitors due to its usage by the Yugoslav Army. The D128 route connects the island’s ferry port with the county capital of Sibenik.

Kornati

The Kornati is a stone maze of eighty-nine islands, islets, and cliffs in the sea. The Mediterranean’s most indented island group. From the air, from the coast… or from the island perspectives to the sea, the view of the Kornati islands is as spectacular – and radically distinct to the eye. Each is worth the time and effort to learn about. The Kornati islands’ dry stone walls are silent, but they always testify to human labor on the sparse land in the stone surrounded by crystal clear sea. Kornati are Mediterranean stone pearls. When the sea reveals rage and might that is lived without regard for the man, this national park is a well-known safe space for sailors…On a total park area of 216.78 km2, there are 89 islands, islets, and reefs. A wonderful indentation comes to life before our eyes, generating diverse sceneries, even through these dry forms. Kornati are a formidable aerial sight. As seen from the vantage points on the islands. Also from the water, as the ship navigates a sea maze at the base of numerous cliffs. The National Park’s islands are separated into two groups: Kornati and Pikerski. They were called after Kornati, the largest of the islands. The archipelago inside the Park has a maximum width of 6 kilometers.

Telašćica

The contrast between calm coastlines and rugged cliffs, Aleppo pine and holm oak woods, and pastures, vineyards, and olive orchards alongside the rocky meadows is striking. The Park contains a Mediterranean vegetation with over 400 plant species, as well as other rare and indigenous flora. The seabed is home to about 250 plant and 300 animal life, including today’s scant red corals and carnivorous sponges. The park also serves as a haven for the island’s donkeys, which wander freely in the Mir Bay region. Many boaters go to Telascica Bay, one of the safest, most beautiful, and largest natural harbors in the Adriatic, with six islands and cliffs, 25 bays, and 69 kilometers of indented coastline. Also, strmac – “rocks” – rises to 200 meters above sea level and then descends vertically to 90 meters. Several species, including the gray falcon and the eleonora’s falcon, make their homes here, while the salt lake “Mir,” which contains medicinal mud, is home to an endemic eel known as the “caiman.” The park offers scheduled nature excursions, cruises, water activities, diving, fishing, cycling, and picture hunting to guests, as well as traditional seafood dishes in several of the park’s restaurants.

Murter

Murter, in the northwestern section of the island, and Tisno, in the southern part, are the two main communities. The villages of Betina on the northwestern shore and Jezera on the southeastern coast are among the island’s other settlements. The island is located in the northwest corner of the Sibenik archipelago, divided from the mainland by a 20-meter-wide (66-foot-wide) sea canal near Tisno, which is spanned by a small drawbridge. The highest point on the island is Radu Peak, which stands at 125 meters (410 feet) above sea level and encompasses an area of around 18.7 km2 (7.2 sq mi). Deep within the hill, there are old military tunnels. The southwestern shore is characterized by high slopes separated by several sandy bays. There are many rocky beaches on the island, as well as a few sandy ones. Many Christian documents written in Glagolitic/Slavonic rather than Latin have been discovered and preserved here and at the Vatican. The oldest churches on the island include St. Michael’s church, St. Rock’s chapel, and the church of Our Lady of Gradina. Murter’s people have long been involved in agriculture and fishing, and they are well-known for these talents, as well as producing great olive oil. There is a short video documentary about the tourist season; the title of the film is “Post Mortem,” and it is set off the island.

Skradin

Skradin, about fifteen kilometers from Sibenik, is one of Croatia’s oldest cities. It was given its current name for the first time in the 10th century. This area was inhabited in Illyrian times, but the Romans gave it the name Scardona because it was their administrative, traffic, and trade center in Dalmatia. Skradin’s location at the entrance to the Krka National Park makes it one of the most important nautical destinations in the Adriatic, as well as one of Croatia’s most important tourist destinations. Don’t miss a stroll through the Krka National Park, one of Europe’s most magnificent protected areas, and a visit to Bribirska glavica, a significant ancient site known as Croatian Troy. Also, try some indigenous traditional meals that can only be found in Skradin and the neighboring areas of Prokljan Lake.

Primošten
Primosten has been rapidly developing since 1960. It is discovered by Zagreb students (from the Observatory) and Esperantists. The “Radua” hotel opened in 1966, followed by the “Zora” and “Slava” hotels in 1968, the “Marina Lucica” hotel in 1971, and the marina “Kremik” in 1983. The camp “Adriatic” (Punta Maslina) was created for 3000 campers a little earlier. Primosten is well-known for its sprawling vineyards. On the wall of the United Nations headquarters building in New York, a photograph of one of Primosten’s vines hangs. Vineyards are being examined for inclusion on the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites. Apart from the vineyards, Primosten is famous because of its annual donkey race. Raduca is the largest beach in Primosten, and Mala Raduca has been named one of Croatia’s ten most beautiful beaches. The statue of Our Lady of Loreto in Primosten, along with the pedestal, stands 17 and 30 meters tall, respectively, and is one-tenth the height of the Gaj hill. The monument is made of concrete, is hollow, and has a mosaic finish made of gold, silver, and stained glass. Architect Aron Varga was in charge of the statue’s final appearance, and a team of experts led by mosaicist Milun Garevi worked on the mosaic. It is the world’s largest such monument.

Komiža

Komiza is situated in a deep harbor on the western side of the island Vis, beneath the 600 meter high Hum mountain (1677 inhabitants according to the census from 2001). It is a typical Mediterranean community, with magnificent beaches and tiny streets and buildings crammed together around the harbor, attracting tourists. The moderate Mediterranean climate makes Komiza a lovely place to visit even in the winter. Gusarica, Nova posta, and Velo zalo are three gravel beaches with drinking water along the entire east shore of the Bay of Komiza. Komiza has always been proud of its fishing heritage, which is preserved in the Fisherman’s Museum, which is housed in the old Venetian tower on the promenade (riva), Croatia’s only one. In it are presented classic fishing tools. At the world exposition EXPO 1998 in Lisbon, a replica of the Komiza fishing boat gajeta falkusa highlighted Croatian maritime history. Every year on December 6th, during the feast of St. Nikola, the patron saint of travelers, seamen, and fishermen, a sacrificial boat is burned in front of the parish church of St. Nikola. Local culinary specialties (domestic bread-komiska pogaca, baked meals, grilled pilchards, beans and noodles in a fish stew-brodetto) are served alongside domestic wine. Traditional recipes would be impossible to envisage without these marine fruits. Parachute-sailing, horseback riding, nature walks, and diving are all options for adventurous vacationers. In the vicinity of Vis, there are 20 spots in the depths of the sea with sunken planes, sailing ships, submarines, and warships. Visit the Fisherman’s Museum and the music-dramatic manifestations of Komiza’s Cultural Summer, where you can hear klapa-songs from the taverns/konobas, if you’re interested in culture and enjoyment.

Biševo

Despite its proximity to the island of Vis, the island of Bisevo contains so much natural beauty in such a tiny space and is home to the world-famous Blue Cave. This natural wonder is now part of the Vis Park Archipelago, which is under the protection of UNESCO, which could ensure its long-term survival and development. Man has etched his mark on the island’s surface, and the famous Blue Cave, a classic dolomite-limestone formation, owes its existence to a human hand. Bisevo is an island on islands and a beautiful nautical zen-luka, thanks to the Blue and Medvidina Caves, Porat Bay and sandy beaches at the other end of the island, and generations of residents who cultivated the island scenery. Even if you know that there are five more caves on the island that are not accessible by boat, Bisevo takes on a mystical tone.

Vis

The town of Vis is situated at the bottom of a well-protected harbour in the north-eastern corner of the island of Vis. It grew out of the old communities of Kut and Luka, which merged in the 16th century when the church Gospa od Spilica was built. With the demilitarisation of the island at the start of the Croatian war (1991-1995), tourism on Vis began to grow considerably. So it’s just been 15 years since the island and its town were both available to tourists. The Yugoslav Army’s stay is documented by the remains of military objects in the northwest and northeast parts of the Bay of Vis. Many visitors, particularly yachtsmen, are flocking to Vis in increasing numbers. Every moment, there are changes in lifestyle, but Vis has retained the old, irresistible Mediterranean charm and a life free of stress and trouble. The fortresses and stony piles attest to Vis’s thousand-year-old settlement, and the remains of a theatre built into the foundations of the Franciscan monastery on the peninsula Prirovo, antique therms, and the Hellenistic cemetery attest to Vis’s status as one of Croatia’s oldest urban centers. The growth of the economic activities of the people of Vis has been determined by natural conditions and tradition. Agriculture has long been the mainstay of the economy due to the abundance of cultivable and high-quality land, particularly in the regions surrounding Vis. Since antiquity, wine-growing has been the most important industry of the locals, as the writer Agatarhid explained, “how the grape from Issa, an island in the Adriatic sea, compares to others better.” The vast fishing grounds in this region of the Adriatic Sea, on the other hand, have influenced the development of fishing. Various sports activities are available in the town. A well-equipped sport and recreation center with four tennis courts, a basketball court, and a football field is available. In Vis, you can also join a sailing, cricket, or paragliding club. Outside of town, there are two diving centers where you can dive with other divers. Mountain climbing and bicycling are also options.

Hvar

Hvar is an old city with a rich history on the same-named Croatian Adriatic Sea island. Hvar is proud to have the most sunny hours of any Adriatic Sea island. Many people describe Hvar as a lovely town because of its architecture, beautiful nature, and good weather. Hvar has a majestic piazza, widely regarded as the most beautiful of its kind in Dalmatia, dominated by St. Stephen’s Cathedral and bordered by Groda’s palaces and the cascading stone-built houses of Burag. Overall, Hvar straightaway presents itself as a monument, a jewel hidden by time. You can see the Fortica (Spanjola) fortress, the cathedral of Hvar, the Hvar theatre (founded in 1612), the arsenal, and the Franciscan monastery. Also, the nightlife in Hvar is what draws a large number of young people from all over the world.

Stari Grad

Stari Grad is Croatia’s oldest town. Greek philoshoper Aristotel was born in Trakia in the same year that Greeks from the island of Paros in the Agean Sea landed on the island of Hvar and christened it Pharos. It is the island of Hvar’s historical heart. The town is set in a landscape where the vivid blue of the sea meets the green of the famous Pharos plain, which is dotted with vineyards and olive trees. The water gave protection and the crops provided nutrition. Both the fields and the water now contribute an appealing element to the island, where modern vacation sites have grown entwined with the town’s and island’s antiquities. Because of its central location on Hvar Island, Stari Grad has long been a safe haven for sailors, who have been greeted by town residents on the port promenade. The bay of Stari Grad is still frequented by most boat passengers going through middle Dalmatia. The village is surrounded by pine trees and is kept cool by summer breezes (maestral). It is one of the few Dalmatian sites where the air is pure and the sleep is soothing on hot summer days. The Town’s thousand-year history has left many monuments in the city’s urban framework.

Zlatni rat (Bol)

Zlatni rat beach is one of the most beautiful beaches in the Mediterranean, and it is also one of the most unique beaches in the world due to its unique shape. Many world-famous business and travel magazines, including the New York Times, National Geographic, and Insider Travel, have featured it as one of the world’s most spectacular beaches in their articles. The elegance and allure of the Zlatni rat have made it a symbol of both the town of Bol and Croatia, and the Croatian government has designated it as a geomorphological monument. But it’s not just the shape that makes it so lovely and one-of-a-kind. It is surrounded by a crystal clear sea that changes color from turquoise to dark blue in just 10 to 20 meters, and it is bordered by decades-old pine trees that were planted by residents to provide natural shade. The beach is less than 2 kilometers from Bol and is connected to a wonderful promenade shaded by pine trees, along which several more little beaches may be found. This intriguing 500-meter-long pebble beach has an unusual shape, like a little peninsula that reaches into the sea on both sides with about 900 meters of beach. The beach spans over 20.000 square meters and can accommodate over 10.000 people comfortably. The beach’s shape and position change depending on the wind, tide, and current, and the tip of the beach occasionally rotates so much that it forms a small pool. Mornings are usually windless, and the wind blows every afternoon, but one side of the beach always has calm water, making it ideal for families with small children.

Lučica

Lucice Bay is a favorite with sailors that cruise this stretch of the Brac coastline. The cove is divided into five sections, each of which provides enough wind protection. Aside from sailors, the cove is attractive to divers due to a cave in the western section of the lagoon. The sea in Lucice has an incredible sky-blue color that simply encourages guests to swim along the sandy floor and lush pine trees. Numerous summer cottages, apartments, and rooms are available for rent. Nearby restaurants serve Dalmatian specialties as well as a wide variety of fresh fish.

General note: This route can be used only in good weather conditions. In bad weather conditions, you can correct the route on your own by using nautical maps and pilot books. In order to avoid heavy sea traffic which usually occurs on the official disembarkation days, we recommend you return to the base on the evening before, until 18:00 hours.

6. ROUTE: SPLIT – SPLIT – 14 days

Route duration: 14 days

Route direction: south

Detailed route descriptions available when clicking on the above image.

  • 1. day Check in Split – Uvala Lučice (island Brač – south)
  • 2. day Uvala Lučice (island Brač – south) – Zlatni Rat (island Brač) – Jelsa (island Hvar)
  • 3. day Jelsa (island Hvar) – anchorage Tiha (near Starigrad – island Hvar)
  • 4. day anchorage Tiha (island Hvar) – Pakleni Islands (Aci Marina Hvar – Palmižana – island Hvar)
  • 5. day Pakleni Islands (Aci Marina Hvar – Palmižana – island Hvar) – Vela Luka (Island Korčula)
  • 6. day Vela Luka (Island Korčula) – Lumbarda or Town Korčula (island Korčula)
  • 7. day Lumbarda or Town Korčula (island Korčula) – Pomena (Nature Park – island Mljet)
  • 8. day Pomena (Nature Park – island Mljet) – Zaklopatica (island Lastovo)
  • 9. day Zaklopatica (island Lastovo) – Town Vis (island Vis)
  • 10. day Town Vis (island Vis) – Biševo (island) – Komiža (island Vis)
  • 11. day Komiža (island Vis) – Maslinica or Šešula bay (island Šolta)
  • 12. day Maslinica or Šešula bay (island Šolta) – Krknjaši (island Veli Drvenik) – Town Trogir
  • 13. day Town Trogir – Milna or anchorage Bobovišća (island Brač)
  • 14. day Milna or anchorage Bobovišća (island Brač) – Split
  • 15. day Check out Split

Split

Split has a long history, reaching back to the time when Roman Emperor Diocletian opted to build his palace on a peninsula near the famous Roman city of Salona, where he wished to spend his final years. During these 1700 years, the Palace gradually evolved into a city, which continues to entice visitors with its rich tradition, beautiful history, and natural and cultural heritage beauty. Since 1979, Diocletian Palace and the entire historical centre of Split have been listed on the UNESCO World Heritage List, not only because of the Palace’s exceptional preservation, but also because the Palace and its city (or the city and its Palace, if you prefer) continue to live a full life. In this edifice, all historical strata from ancient Rome through the Middle Ages are still visible and alive. A stroll through the ancient city transports you back in time, passing by magnificent examples of ancient architecture such as Peristyle, the middle-aged Romanesque Church, and Gothic Palace, Renaissance portals of noblemen’s houses, Baroque facades, and modern architecture superbly merged in the rich heritage. This division is replicated in Split’s daily life. Locals sit in the same cafes, restaurants, and shops as tourists, creating the sense that they have become a part of the city’s rhythm just by coming in Split. The vegetable and fish markets are the heart of every family’s existence in Split, just as the entire social life of this city of 200 thousand people is reflected on the Riva (waterfront), where every visitor should try to take his coffee alongside the city’s rowdy, temperamental residents. Split is much more than just beautiful architecture. Split is also home to excellent gourmet and wine experiences, as well as numerous cultural events such as film and theater festivals, exhibitions, excellent museums, and concerts. It is a city that offers a diverse range of entertainment options, from numerous clubs and bars to street festivals and events such as the Ultra Europe Festival, which attracts up to 100,000 young people from over a hundred countries each year. Only a few cities of similar size around the world can match Split’s sporting achievements, as it is home to a dozen Olympic medalists as well as other sports medalists. When you’ve had your fill of the city’s hustle and bustle, head to Marjan, the city’s icon, with its forest, jogging routes, mountain climbing and bicycling, recreational terrains, as well as the historic churches where Split’s late people found spiritual serenity. The several beaches with exceptionally clean sea, ranging from the well-known Bavice to the stone isolated oasis’ all surrounding Marjan, are also unique to find in a city the size of Split.

Lučica

Lucice Bay is a favorite with sailors that cruise this stretch of the Brac coastline. The cove is divided into five sections, each of which provides enough wind protection. Aside from sailors, the cove is attractive to divers due to a cave in the western section of the lagoon. The sea in Lucice has an incredible sky-blue color that simply encourages guests to swim along the sandy floor and lush pine trees. Numerous summer cottages, apartments, and rooms are available for rent. Nearby restaurants serve Dalmatian specialties as well as a wide variety of fresh fish.

Zlatni rat (Bol)

Zlatni rat beach is one of the most beautiful beaches in the Mediterranean, and it is also one of the most unique beaches in the world due to its unique shape. Many world-famous business and travel magazines, including the New York Times, National Geographic, and Insider Travel, have featured it as one of the world’s most spectacular beaches in their articles. The elegance and allure of the Zlatni rat have made it a symbol of both the town of Bol and Croatia, and the Croatian government has designated it as a geomorphological monument. But it’s not just the shape that makes it so lovely and one-of-a-kind. It is surrounded by a crystal clear sea that changes color from turquoise to dark blue in just 10 to 20 meters, and it is bordered by decades-old pine trees that were planted by residents to provide natural shade. The beach is less than 2 kilometers from Bol and is connected to a wonderful promenade shaded by pine trees, along which several more little beaches may be found. This intriguing 500-meter-long pebble beach has an unusual shape, like a little peninsula that reaches into the sea on both sides with about 900 meters of beach. The beach spans over 20.000 square meters and can accommodate over 10.000 people comfortably. The beach’s shape and position change depending on the wind, tide, and current, and the tip of the beach occasionally rotates so much that it forms a small pool. Mornings are usually windless, and the wind blows every afternoon, but one side of the beach always has calm water, making it ideal for families with small children.

Jelsa

Jelsa is located in the middle of Hvar Island, on the northern side of the island, by the sea. It is bordered on all sides by the tallest peaks on the island, including St. Nicholas on the west and Hum on the east. It features a lovely rough coastline with gorgeous tiny islands, bays, and capes, just like the rest of the island. Pine tree forests, vineyards, lavender farms, olive gardens, and a crystal clean coastline abound in Jelsa. There are also magnificent beaches there. They are accessible by foot, automobile, or boat. It’s interesting to note that Jelsa is barely 2 kilometers from the island’s sole genuine sandy beach. Jelsa is now a tourist destination with all the requisite tourist attractions such as cafés, restaurants, art galleries, and souvenir shops. Take a stroll through the town center to see the many churches, squares, municipal parks, and lapidary. The climate in this lovely little Mediterranean town is agreeable, with moderate winters and pleasant summers. The town plaza, known as Pjaca, is located right below the parish church and serves as the social hub. It’s a gathering spot for residents to share news, opine on current events, and even gossip. They are always delighted to share their comfortable atmosphere with their guests as nice hosts.

Stari Grad

Stari Grad is Croatia’s oldest town. Greek philoshoper Aristotel was born in Trakia in the same year that Greeks from the island of Paros in the Agean Sea landed on the island of Hvar and christened it Pharos. It is the island of Hvar’s historical heart. The town is set in a landscape where the vivid blue of the sea meets the green of the famous Pharos plain, which is dotted with vineyards and olive trees. The water gave protection and the crops provided nutrition. Both the fields and the water now contribute an appealing element to the island, where modern vacation sites have grown entwined with the town’s and island’s antiquities. Because of its central location on Hvar Island, Stari Grad has long been a safe haven for sailors, who have been greeted by town residents on the port promenade. The bay of Stari Grad is still frequented by most boat passengers going through middle Dalmatia. The village is surrounded by pine trees and is kept cool by summer breezes (maestral). It is one of the few Dalmatian sites where the air is pure and the sleep is soothing on hot summer days. The Town’s thousand-year history has left many monuments in the city’s urban framework.

Hvar

Hvar is an old city with a rich history on the same-named Croatian Adriatic Sea island. Hvar is proud to have the most sunny hours of any Adriatic Sea island. Many people describe Hvar as a lovely town because of its architecture, beautiful nature, and good weather. Hvar has a majestic piazza, widely regarded as the most beautiful of its kind in Dalmatia, dominated by St. Stephen’s Cathedral and bordered by Groda’s palaces and the cascading stone-built houses of Burag. Overall, Hvar straightaway presents itself as a monument, a jewel hidden by time. You can see the Fortica (Spanjola) fortress, the cathedral of Hvar, the Hvar theatre (founded in 1612), the arsenal, and the Franciscan monastery. Also, the nightlife in Hvar is what draws a large number of young people from all over the world.

Pakleni otoci

The Paklinski islands are ‘anchored’ on the popular route between Split and Vis, and their 21 nautically appealing islands, islets, and cliffs that appear to be attached to the town of Hvar by an umbilical cord ensure a unique sea experience. Paklina is a sort of pine resin used in shipbuilding, and the islands are named after it. St. Clement is by far the largest island in this ‘hellishly’ magnificent sea sanctuary. Its southern sides are ornamented with various turquoise bays, while the ACI marina Palmiana provides a safe refuge on the north side of the island, and branching island trails connect them. Smaller islets can be found on both sides of the island, with Marinkovac and Jerolim to the east and Marinkovac and Jerolim to the west. The Paklinski islands, in particular, provide sailors with the widest choice of options. Whether you prefer tight ties or anchoring, wild nightlife or the sound of crickets, popular gastronomic destinations or family households, or simply want to raise your heart rate while exploring these green oases on your own strength, the Paklinski islands unquestionably ‘hide’ a paradise for anyone who enjoys yachting! ACI Marina Palmizana provides safe protection in all weather situations, particularly in the northwestern half of the marina. It is popular with boaters since it is ideally incorporated into the natural environment while also providing all of the required amenities of civilization, such as restrooms, a market, a restaurant, fast food, an ATM, and free Wi-Fi. This seasonally open port is often bustling, especially on days when large fleets of youthful boats visit. It’s a great place to start exploring the entire island.

Vela luka

Vela Luka is a small settlement on the western side of the island of Korula, nestled in a large bay. Numerous coves exist in Vela Luka Bay, which are surrounded by vineyards, olive gardens, fig trees, and pine trees. It’s is the largest town on the island, with a population of 4500 people. Also, it’s a safe anchorage and harbor for boats. Vela Luka is a popular tourist destination due to its moderate climate and natural splendors such as sweeping views, crystal clear seas, and lovely beaches. It also has a diverse cultural past, numerous sporting and entertainment events, and, most importantly, friendly and welcoming hosts.

Lumbarda

Lumbarda is a small fishermen’s village on the eastern end of the Croatian island of Korcula, a few kilometers from Korcula town. These two locations are connected by a road that runs through a beautiful landscape of pine trees and olive gardens. The settlement is surrounded by sandy vineyards, which produce the well-known white wine ‘Grk,’ which is made from local grapes. Vela Przina, Bilin Zal, and Tatinja are three of the most popular sandy beaches in the vicinity. The village also serves as a tourist destination. The majority of its 1200 residents are winegrowers, fishermen, and stonemasons who work in the local tourism business. It also has a long and illustrious history, with written records stretching back over two thousand years to Greek times. Lumbarda’s beaches are considered to be among the best on Korcula Island, and are ideal for children and families. Near the seaside, local travel agency and rental firms provide well-stocked water sports equipment, including windsurfing boards, paddleboards, sea kayaks, and boat rentals, to name a few.

Korcula

Korcula town has a reputation for being a place of ancient beauty, with beautiful beaches and a slew of swanky eateries. Korcula town, a medieval village brimming with rustic beauty, is a year-round destination. The palm-lined alleyways and historic surrounding walls sometimes draw comparisons to Dubrovnik, which is only a short distance away. It’s easy to understand why – Korcula town remains mostly unaffected by the throngs of tourists who go to the coastal metropolis during the summer months. All the more reason for locals and well-informed visitors to enjoy the laid-back, Mediterranean lifestyle.

Mljet

Mljet is the first big island encountered when travelling from south to north along the Croatian Adriatic. With its Mediterranean greenery, clear and pure sea, gently sandy shoreline, and plenty of underwater sea life, it is Croatia’s greenest island. The island is also considered to be one of Croatia’s most beautiful islands. Mljet is famous for its white and red wines, as well as olives and goat’s cheese. It is, indeed, a pristine island cloaked in a thicket of Mediterranean vegetation. The sea around here is teeming with fish and other aquatic creatures. The island’s two salty lakes, Veliko and Malo Jezero, are located on the north end of the island and are well-known. An historic Benedictine monastery may be found on the small St Mary’s Island in the midst of Veliko Jezero lake. Veliko and Malo Jezero, in addition to beach Saplunara (in the south of the island), are popular swimming places for both locals and visitors. The northwestern half of the island of Mljet is also a Croatian National Park, making it one of the most popular locations for visitors to this region of the country. The island provides frequent ferry links to Dubrovnik as well as a car ferry connection to the Croatian mainland’s Peljesac Peninsula.

Lastovo

With its 46 little islands, 46 churches and chapels, 46 vineyards, and surrounding sandbanks, it is a true paradise for nature lovers, sailors, food and wine connoisseurs, and tuna and other trophy fish anglers. Lastovo has reopened to tourists after a fifty-year hiatus. Aside from the natural beauty of the island, it is known for its carnival, in which all of the island people dress up in traditional costumes. The iconic Lastovo chimneys, which were previously status insignia of historic Lastovo households, are unique tourist attractions on the island. Ferries run regularly from Split, Dubrovnik, Mljet, and Korcula to Lastovo.

Vis

The town of Vis is situated at the bottom of a well-protected harbour in the north-eastern corner of the island of Vis. It grew out of the old communities of Kut and Luka, which merged in the 16th century when the church Gospa od Spilica was built. With the demilitarisation of the island at the start of the Croatian war (1991-1995), tourism on Vis began to grow considerably. So it’s just been 15 years since the island and its town were both available to tourists. The Yugoslav Army’s stay is documented by the remains of military objects in the northwest and northeast parts of the Bay of Vis. Many visitors, particularly yachtsmen, are flocking to Vis in increasing numbers. Every moment, there are changes in lifestyle, but Vis has retained the old, irresistible Mediterranean charm and a life free of stress and trouble. The fortresses and stony piles attest to Vis’s thousand-year-old settlement, and the remains of a theatre built into the foundations of the Franciscan monastery on the peninsula Prirovo, antique therms, and the Hellenistic cemetery attest to Vis’s status as one of Croatia’s oldest urban centers. The growth of the economic activities of the people of Vis has been determined by natural conditions and tradition. Agriculture has long been the mainstay of the economy due to the abundance of cultivable and high-quality land, particularly in the regions surrounding Vis. Since antiquity, wine-growing has been the most important industry of the locals, as the writer Agatarhid explained, “how the grape from Issa, an island in the Adriatic sea, compares to others better.” The vast fishing grounds in this region of the Adriatic Sea, on the other hand, have influenced the development of fishing. Various sports activities are available in the town. A well-equipped sport and recreation center with four tennis courts, a basketball court, and a football field is available. In Vis, you can also join a sailing, cricket, or paragliding club. Outside of town, there are two diving centers where you can dive with other divers. Mountain climbing and bicycling are also options.

Biševo

Despite its proximity to the island of Vis, the island of Bisevo contains so much natural beauty in such a tiny space and is home to the world-famous Blue Cave. This natural wonder is now part of the Vis Park Archipelago, which is under the protection of UNESCO, which could ensure its long-term survival and development. Man has etched his mark on the island’s surface, and the famous Blue Cave, a classic dolomite-limestone formation, owes its existence to a human hand. Bisevo is an island on islands and a beautiful nautical zen-luka, thanks to the Blue and Medvidina Caves, Porat Bay and sandy beaches at the other end of the island, and generations of residents who cultivated the island scenery. Even if you know that there are five more caves on the island that are not accessible by boat, Bisevo takes on a mystical tone.

Komiža

Komiza is situated in a deep harbor on the western side of the island Vis, beneath the 600 meter high Hum mountain (1677 inhabitants according to the census from 2001). It is a typical Mediterranean community, with magnificent beaches and tiny streets and buildings crammed together around the harbor, attracting tourists. The moderate Mediterranean climate makes Komiza a lovely place to visit even in the winter. Gusarica, Nova posta, and Velo zalo are three gravel beaches with drinking water along the entire east shore of the Bay of Komiza. Komiza has always been proud of its fishing heritage, which is preserved in the Fisherman’s Museum, which is housed in the old Venetian tower on the promenade (riva), Croatia’s only one. In it are presented classic fishing tools. At the world exposition EXPO 1998 in Lisbon, a replica of the Komiza fishing boat gajeta falkusa highlighted Croatian maritime history. Every year on December 6th, during the feast of St. Nikola, the patron saint of travelers, seamen, and fishermen, a sacrificial boat is burned in front of the parish church of St. Nikola. Local culinary specialties (domestic bread-komiska pogaca, baked meals, grilled pilchards, beans and noodles in a fish stew-brodetto) are served alongside domestic wine. Traditional recipes would be impossible to envisage without these marine fruits. Parachute-sailing, horseback riding, nature walks, and diving are all options for adventurous vacationers. In the vicinity of Vis, there are 20 spots in the depths of the sea with sunken planes, sailing ships, submarines, and warships. Visit the Fisherman’s Museum and the music-dramatic manifestations of Komiza’s Cultural Summer, where you can hear klapa-songs from the taverns/konobas, if you’re interested in culture and enjoyment.

Maslinica

A lovely pine forest with secluded rocky beaches may be found on the bay’s south side. Maslinica is one of the most beautiful sites in the Adriatic, with an archipelago of seven islets (Polebrnjak, Saskinja, Stipanska, Kamik, Balkun, Rudula, and Grmej) in front of it. The historical, architectural, and environmental values of the old castle and attractive stone buildings are in perfect harmony with the grandeur of the surrounding landscape. The town grew up around the castle built by the Marchi noble family in 1708. Because of the frequent pirate raids, the Marchi brothers asked permission from the Venetian ruler to construct a fortress with a tower to protect the village. The originally modest fishermen’s settlement gradually expanded into a tourist and nautical center of the island after the castle was restored and a marina was built, receiving more and more tourists and repeat guests each year. A 300-year-old castle has been meticulously restored as a heritage hotel with individually designed luxury suites, a helideck, and a fine dining establishment. This is a fantastic tourist destination for those who enjoy nature, unspoiled beaches, and crystal clear waters, and it’s recently become increasingly popular with cyclists, rowers, yachtsmen, and divers, as well as recreational fishing and hunting enthusiasts. Adventuresome travelers will undoubtedly go on a jet-ski ride, while others who prefer to relax in the sun will visit the lovely pebble beach or travel to the neighboring Sipova Bay, where they will be pleasantly delighted to find the island’s sole sandy beach! Kayaking to one of the islets is also a wonderful option – the view of the adjacent bays, Trogir and Drvenik, from the Parish Church of St. Nicholas is pretty rewarding, but the vista of the sun setting behind the islets spread in the water like pearls is guaranteed to leave you speechless! Those who want to stay near the water can take advantage of the biking/hiking track that connects Maslinica with Donje Selo and Srednje Selo. You can also go to the adjacent eula Bay, which has a safe mooring spot due to its geographical location and heavily indented coastline. There, you can sample regional dishes for a one-of-a-kind dining experience. Maslinica got a national award in 2012 for the greatest tourist destination in the Adriatic with fewer than a thousand inhabitants, in recognition of its preserved natural beauty and tourist achievements, and again in 2017 for the best Authentic Coastal Destination!

Šešula bay

On the island of Solta, the Sesula bay is located south of Maslinica. It is one of the most visited bays on the western half of the island of Solta because of its protected position from all winds. This little bay is a boater’s delight, and the lovely scenery, clear water, and attractive pebble beaches add to the appeal. The harbor of Sesula is also accessible from the land, and it takes 15 minutes to walk from Maslinica. You can get there by car, but the entrance route is a macadam road. As a result, we recommend visiting this bay by boat from the sea or by bicycle from the land.

Drvenik Veli

Drvenik Veliki is a small island off the coast of Dalmatia, about 8 nautical miles from Trogir. It covers a total area of 12.07 square kilometers. The island’s lone community, the near-eponymous village of Drvenik Veliki, has a population of 168 people, and it was first populated in the 15th century. The island is referred to as “Gerona” or “Giruan” in Croatian monuments from the 13th century. The coastline is rocky, with numerous bays and sandy and pebbly beaches. Beautiful bay Solinska is located on the island’s south side, while Krknjasi, also known as Blue Lagoon, is located on the island’s east side. There will be a lovely location to eat there with fresh sea cuisine or whatever else you desire. There are several apartments, a few restaurants, a bakery, and a small store in the ancient village. There are numerous beaches nearby, and the residents are warm and welcoming. Unspoiled nature, lovely beaches, and a tranquil setting are ideal for a quiet and private vacation. You’ll feel as if you’ve traveled back in time. It takes around an hour to travel to Trogir on the local boat line Jadrolinija. Every day, the boat travels from the Trogir and Seget Donji waterfronts towards Drvenik Mali and then returns to Trogir.

Trogir

Trogir is a lovely medieval town located just north of Split on the mainland, with a bridge connecting it to the mainland and the island of Ciovo. The town has a long history dating back to the Illyrians, Greeks, and Romans, all of whom contributed to its construction. Trogir Old Town is now a Unesco world heritage site and a fantastic tourist destination. Whether you simply wish to enjoy a meal in an atmospheric ancient city or learn more about the area’s history. The town is home to a number of outstanding restaurants, bars, cocktail lounges, and cafes. Several shopping centers are also nearby (across the old Town Bridge, on the main market square). The most colorful is Trogir Old Town Fruit Market, which is just by the bridge – full of beautiful local produce, not only the freshest organic fruit and vegetables, but also honey, olive oil, cured meats, and local wine/liqueurs. A good butcher may be found in the back of the market, or if you like fish, head across the road to a small fish market.

Milna

Milna is one of the Dalmatian coast’s most architecturally harmonious instances of Baroque urbanism. It is the great natural harbor on the island of Brac, and it served as a haven for the emperor’s fleet while the Diocletian’s Palace in Split was being built. Milna is located in a bay that divides into two sleeves – Zalo and Pantera. The harbor, which is located on the western side of the island of Bra, offers safety and protection from all winds, making it one of the safest recognized bays for charter boats throughout the summer season. It is a small town in the west of the island, about 18 kilometers from Supetar, the island’s main hub. It became to be the most significant port on the island of Brac, a position it retained for two centuries. Milna, with three state-of-the-art marinas and a bay overlooking the sea strait Splitska vrata, is sure to exceed the expectations of even the most discerning yachtsmen. It has a long and lovely promenade lined with stone houses that are masterpieces of traditional architecture. The town is dominated by a Baroque church with a typical Dalmatian belfry. The inside of the church is filled with outstanding Venetian artworks.

Bobovišče

At the foot of a natural bay that branches into numerous smaller ones, the largest of which is Vicja draga, with which many legends and myths are related, the settlement of Bobovisca grew along the shore as a port to the communities of Bobovisca and Lozisca. Because of its natural location, it has long been a safe refuge for ships fleeing all kind of maritime perils, and it is now an inevitable bay and a safe harbor for many boaters seeking to enjoy the unique beauty of protected nature and clean sea. Numerous archeological findings and items discovered in the sea and on land in the settlement’s vicinity (although much has yet to be studied) attest to Bobovisce’s importance. It is the only Brac community without its own church, and the fortified castle (constructed in the Renaissance-Baroque style) of the Gligo family (Marincevic) dominates the bay. Bobovisca is known as the “poet’s port” because it is the home of the Nazor family, which includes one of Croatia’s best poets and writers, Vladimir Nazor. The acropolis with its concrete three-pillar, which the poet dedicated to his sisters and named “Three Sisters,” is the symbolic monument. A statue of Vladimir Nazor stands at the bay’s bottom. Because of its natural assets, it is now a popular climbing destination with the potential to grow active sports and adventure tourism alongside nautical tourism.

General note: This route can be used only in good weather conditions. In bad weather conditions, you can correct the route on your own by using nautical maps and pilot books. In order to avoid heavy sea traffic which usually occurs on the official disembarkation days, we recommend you return to the base on the evening before, until 18:00 hours.

7. ROUTE: DUBROVNIK – DUBROVNIK – 7 days

Route duration: 7 days

Route direction: north

Detailed route descriptions available when clicking on the above image.

  • 1. day Check in Dubrovnik
  • 2. day Dubrovnik – Šipanska Luka (island Šipan)
  • 3. day Šipanska Luka (island Šipan) – Polače (island Mljet)
  • 4. day Polače (island Mljet) – Skrivena Luka or Zaklopatica (Nature Park – island Lastovo)
  • 5. day Skrivena Luka or Zaklopatica (Nature Park – island Lastovo) – Town Korčula (island Korčula)
  • 6. day Town Korčula (island Korčula) – Pomena (island Mljet)
  • 7. day Pomena (island Mljet) – Kobaš (peninsula Pelješac) – Dubrovnik
  • 8. day Check out Dubrovnik

Dubrovnik

Dubrovnik is Croatia’s most popular tourist destination, and it’s easy to understand why. It’s a walled, sea-battered city at the foot of a grizzled mountain. Dubrovnik’s historic heart, which was primarily a medieval town reconstructed by Baroque planners following the earthquake of 1667, appears to have been suspended in time ever since. Set-piece churches and public buildings merge in perfectly with the green-shuttered stone houses, providing a magnificent ensemble that has escaped the ravages of time. Outside the city walls, Dubrovnik’s suburbs ooze Mediterranean elegance: gardens ablaze with vibrant bougainvillea and oleanders; trees laden with figs, lemons, oranges, and peaches.

Šipan

Sipan is most likely the Elaphites’ most peaceful and well-preserved island. This island is known for its beautiful, hidden beaches, winds that bring the aroma of medicinal herbs, majestic sunsets, and ancient ruins. Fishermen still cast nets at dawn and sell their catch to boaters and swimmers from the boat.  The ‘Island of Eagles,’ as Sipan is also known, was a favorite destination of the Dubrovnik aristocracy in the 16th and 17th centuries, according to the Latin word for eagle (gypana). On Sipan, several vineyards give place to enormous pines, branched olive trees, and ancient figs, and almonds and tomatoes flourish in abundance. Sipan is 17 kilometers or an hour and a half by boat from Dubrovnik, and a visit there is a must. Check the ipan ferry schedule, however be cautious during the winter months when ferries run less often and the last ferry’s departure time is rather changeable.

Polace

Polace is a settlement on Mljet’s northern coast, in the western portion of the island. It is the island’s largest and safest bay, as it is hidden and protected by four small islands: Tajnik, Moranik, Ovrata, and Kobrava. The bay is particularly popular among sailors and yachtsmen for anchoring because of its sheltered location. The bay is 5.6 kilometers long and 4 kilometers wide. Polace is also one of Mljet’s ferry terminals. The town has a population of slightly over a hundred permanent residents. There are a few restaurants and cafes here, as well as a grocery store. A number of old ruins ranging from the 1st to the 6th centuries may be found in the area. The Roman palace, hence the name “Polace” from the 5th century, is the most important structure in the community. From the Roman era, this is one of Dalmatia’s largest structures.

Lastovo

With its 46 little islands, 46 churches and chapels, 46 vineyards, and surrounding sandbanks, it is a true paradise for nature lovers, sailors, food and wine connoisseurs, and tuna and other trophy fish anglers. Lastovo has reopened to tourists after a fifty-year hiatus. Aside from the natural beauty of the island, it is known for its carnival, in which all of the island people dress up in traditional costumes. The iconic Lastovo chimneys, which were previously status insignia of historic Lastovo households, are unique tourist attractions on the island. Ferries run regularly from Split, Dubrovnik, Mljet, and Korcula to Lastovo.

Korcula

Korcula town has a reputation for being a place of ancient beauty, with beautiful beaches and a slew of swanky eateries. Korcula town, a medieval village brimming with rustic beauty, is a year-round destination. The palm-lined alleyways and historic surrounding walls sometimes draw comparisons to Dubrovnik, which is only a short distance away. It’s easy to understand why – Korcula town remains mostly unaffected by the throngs of tourists who go to the coastal metropolis during the summer months. All the more reason for locals and well-informed visitors to enjoy the laid-back, Mediterranean lifestyle.

Mljet

Mljet is the first big island encountered when travelling from south to north along the Croatian Adriatic. With its Mediterranean greenery, clear and pure sea, gently sandy shoreline, and plenty of underwater sea life, it is Croatia’s greenest island. The island is also considered to be one of Croatia’s most beautiful islands. Mljet is famous for its white and red wines, as well as olives and goat’s cheese. It is, indeed, a pristine island cloaked in a thicket of Mediterranean vegetation. The sea around here is teeming with fish and other aquatic creatures. The island’s two salty lakes, Veliko and Malo Jezero, are located on the north end of the island and are well-known. An historic Benedictine monastery may be found on the small St Mary’s Island in the midst of Veliko Jezero lake. Veliko and Malo Jezero, in addition to beach Saplunara (in the south of the island), are popular swimming places for both locals and visitors. The northwestern half of the island of Mljet is also a Croatian National Park, making it one of the most popular locations for visitors to this region of the country. The island provides frequent ferry links to Dubrovnik as well as a car ferry connection to the Croatian mainland’s Peljesac Peninsula.

General note: This route can be used only in good weather conditions. In bad weather conditions, you can correct the route on your own by using nautical maps and pilot books. In order to avoid heavy sea traffic which usually occurs on the official disembarkation days, we recommend you return to the base on the evening before, until 18:00 hours.

8. ROUTE: DUBROVNIK – DUBROVNIK – 14 days

Route duration: 14 days

Route direction: north

Detailed route descriptions available when clicking on the above image.

  • 1. day Check in Dubrovnik
  • 2. day Dubrovnik – Lopud (beach Šunj) – Šipanska Luka (island Šipan)
  • 3. day Šipanska Luka (island Šipan) – Polače (island Mljet)
  • 4. day Polače (island Mljet) – Orebić (peninsula Pelješac) or Town Korčula (island Korčula)
  • 5. day Orebić (peninsula Pelješac) or Town Korčula (island Korčula) – Aci Marina Hvar (island Hvar)
  • 6. day Aci Marina Hvar (Palmižana – island Hvar) – Milna or Zlatni Rat (island Brač)
  • 7. day Milna or Zlatni Rat (island Brač) – Vela Luka (island Korčula)
  • 8. day Vela Luka (Korčula) – Lastovo (Nature Park – island Lastovo)
  • 9. day Lastovo (Nature Park – island Lastovo) – Pomena (Nature Park – island Mljet)
  • 10. day Pomena (Nature Park – island Mljet) – Prožura (Mljet)
  • 11. day Prožura (Mljet) – Kobaš (peninsula Pelješac)
  • 12. day Kobaš (peninsula Pelješac) – Koločep (island)
  • 13. day Koločep (island) – Zaton
  • 14. day Zaton – Dubrovnik
  • 14. day Check out Dubrovnik

Dubrovnik

Dubrovnik is Croatia’s most popular tourist destination, and it’s easy to understand why. It’s a walled, sea-battered city at the foot of a grizzled mountain. Dubrovnik’s historic heart, which was primarily a medieval town reconstructed by Baroque planners following the earthquake of 1667, appears to have been suspended in time ever since. Set-piece churches and public buildings merge in perfectly with the green-shuttered stone houses, providing a magnificent ensemble that has escaped the ravages of time. Outside the city walls, Dubrovnik’s suburbs ooze Mediterranean elegance: gardens ablaze with vibrant bougainvillea and oleanders; trees laden with figs, lemons, oranges, and peaches.

Lopud

Lopud is a Croatian island that is part of the Elafiti archipelago, a series of islands off the coast of Dubrovnik known as Dubrovnik’s islands. The island, which is slightly over 7 nautical miles (approximately 14 kilometers) from Dubrovnik, has only a few hundred permanent residents. Lopud is one of the most popular islands to stay near Dubrovnik, with a daily ferry boat line connecting it to the city. The finest seasons to visit Lopud are in the spring and autumn. The months of June and September are the least popular with tourists, as compared to July and August, when the island is packed with families with children on vacation. The weather is even better than in July and August (milder temperatures), therefore hiking and other outdoor activities other than beach, swim, sunbath, and snorkeling are possible. The usual sea temperature is still around 22°C, which is perfect for open-water swimming.

Šipan

Sipan is most likely the Elaphites’ most peaceful and well-preserved island. This island is known for its beautiful, hidden beaches, winds that bring the aroma of medicinal herbs, majestic sunsets, and ancient ruins. Fishermen still cast nets at dawn and sell their catch to boaters and swimmers from the boat.  The ‘Island of Eagles,’ as Sipan is also known, was a favorite destination of the Dubrovnik aristocracy in the 16th and 17th centuries, according to the Latin word for eagle (gypana). On Sipan, several vineyards give place to enormous pines, branched olive trees, and ancient figs, and almonds and tomatoes flourish in abundance. Sipan is 17 kilometers or an hour and a half by boat from Dubrovnik, and a visit there is a must. Check the ipan ferry schedule, however be cautious during the winter months when ferries run less often and the last ferry’s departure time is rather changeable.

Polace

Polace is a settlement on Mljet’s northern coast, in the western portion of the island. It is the island’s largest and safest bay, as it is hidden and protected by four small islands: Tajnik, Moranik, Ovrata, and Kobrava. The bay is particularly popular among sailors and yachtsmen for anchoring because of its sheltered location. The bay is 5.6 kilometers long and 4 kilometers wide. Polace is also one of Mljet’s ferry terminals. The town has a population of slightly over a hundred permanent residents. There are a few restaurants and cafes here, as well as a grocery store. A number of old ruins ranging from the 1st to the 6th centuries may be found in the area. The Roman palace, hence the name “Polace” from the 5th century, is the most important structure in the community. From the Roman era, this is one of Dalmatia’s largest structures.

Pelješac

Peljesac is the longest Dalmatian peninsula, deeply indented and mostly forested, with a coast dotted with beaches, reefs, bays, and fjords. Peljesac was inhabited in antiquity by Illyrians, Greeks, Romans, and, beginning in the seventh century, Slavs and Croats. It was known as Rathaneus Kersones, or the Cape of Lynx, by ancient historians. Peljesac is a peninsula of sailors and captains known for their skill and fearlessness on the high seas, with a century-old maritime tradition. It has long been known for its vineyards, and its varietal wines “Dinga” and “Postup” are well-known throughout the world. They are a unique experience with their picturesque locations on both sides of the coast in the greenery of olive, pine, and macchia. An asphalt road runs the length of the peninsula, connecting all settlements. One branch of the road leads to Trpanj, from which a ferry departs several times per day for Ploce and vice versa. The other branch leads to Orebic, and a ferry connects Peljesac to the island of Korcula.

Korcula

Korcula town has a reputation for being a place of ancient beauty, with beautiful beaches and a slew of swanky eateries. Korcula town, a medieval village brimming with rustic beauty, is a year-round destination. The palm-lined alleyways and historic surrounding walls sometimes draw comparisons to Dubrovnik, which is only a short distance away. It’s easy to understand why – Korcula town remains mostly unaffected by the throngs of tourists who go to the coastal metropolis during the summer months. All the more reason for locals and well-informed visitors to enjoy the laid-back, Mediterranean lifestyle.

Hvar

Hvar is an old city with a rich history on the same-named Croatian Adriatic Sea island. Hvar is proud to have the most sunny hours of any Adriatic Sea island. Many people describe Hvar as a lovely town because of its architecture, beautiful nature, and good weather. Hvar has a majestic piazza, widely regarded as the most beautiful of its kind in Dalmatia, dominated by St. Stephen’s Cathedral and bordered by Groda’s palaces and the cascading stone-built houses of Burag. Overall, Hvar straightaway presents itself as a monument, a jewel hidden by time. You can see the Fortica (Spanjola) fortress, the cathedral of Hvar, the Hvar theatre (founded in 1612), the arsenal, and the Franciscan monastery. Also, the nightlife in Hvar is what draws a large number of young people from all over the world.

Milna

Milna is one of the Dalmatian coast’s most architecturally harmonious instances of Baroque urbanism. It is the great natural harbor on the island of Brac, and it served as a haven for the emperor’s fleet while the Diocletian’s Palace in Split was being built. Milna is located in a bay that divides into two sleeves – Zalo and Pantera. The harbor, which is located on the western side of the island of Bra, offers safety and protection from all winds, making it one of the safest recognized bays for charter boats throughout the summer season. It is a small town in the west of the island, about 18 kilometers from Supetar, the island’s main hub. It became to be the most significant port on the island of Brac, a position it retained for two centuries. Milna, with three state-of-the-art marinas and a bay overlooking the sea strait Splitska vrata, is sure to exceed the expectations of even the most discerning yachtsmen. It has a long and lovely promenade lined with stone houses that are masterpieces of traditional architecture. The town is dominated by a Baroque church with a typical Dalmatian belfry. The inside of the church is filled with outstanding Venetian artworks.

Zlatni rat (Bol)

Zlatni rat beach is one of the most beautiful beaches in the Mediterranean, and it is also one of the most unique beaches in the world due to its unique shape. Many world-famous business and travel magazines, including the New York Times, National Geographic, and Insider Travel, have featured it as one of the world’s most spectacular beaches in their articles. The elegance and allure of the Zlatni rat have made it a symbol of both the town of Bol and Croatia, and the Croatian government has designated it as a geomorphological monument. But it’s not just the shape that makes it so lovely and one-of-a-kind. It is surrounded by a crystal clear sea that changes color from turquoise to dark blue in just 10 to 20 meters, and it is bordered by decades-old pine trees that were planted by residents to provide natural shade. The beach is less than 2 kilometers from Bol and is connected to a wonderful promenade shaded by pine trees, along which several more little beaches may be found. This intriguing 500-meter-long pebble beach has an unusual shape, like a little peninsula that reaches into the sea on both sides with about 900 meters of beach. The beach spans over 20.000 square meters and can accommodate over 10.000 people comfortably. The beach’s shape and position change depending on the wind, tide, and current, and the tip of the beach occasionally rotates so much that it forms a small pool. Mornings are usually windless, and the wind blows every afternoon, but one side of the beach always has calm water, making it ideal for families with small children.

Vela Luka

Vela Luka is a small settlement on the western side of the island of Korula, nestled in a large bay. Numerous coves exist in Vela Luka Bay, which are surrounded by vineyards, olive gardens, fig trees, and pine trees. It’s is the largest town on the island, with a population of 4500 people. Also, it’s a safe anchorage and harbor for boats. Vela Luka is a popular tourist destination due to its moderate climate and natural splendors such as sweeping views, crystal clear seas, and lovely beaches. It also has a diverse cultural past, numerous sporting and entertainment events, and, most importantly, friendly and welcoming hosts.

Lastovo

With its 46 little islands, 46 churches and chapels, 46 vineyards, and surrounding sandbanks, it is a true paradise for nature lovers, sailors, food and wine connoisseurs, and tuna and other trophy fish anglers. Lastovo has reopened to tourists after a fifty-year hiatus. Aside from the natural beauty of the island, it is known for its carnival, in which all of the island people dress up in traditional costumes. The iconic Lastovo chimneys, which were previously status insignia of historic Lastovo households, are unique tourist attractions on the island. Ferries run regularly from Split, Dubrovnik, Mljet, and Korcula to Lastovo.

Mljet

Mljet is the first big island encountered when travelling from south to north along the Croatian Adriatic. With its Mediterranean greenery, clear and pure sea, gently sandy shoreline, and plenty of underwater sea life, it is Croatia’s greenest island. The island is also considered to be one of Croatia’s most beautiful islands. Mljet is famous for its white and red wines, as well as olives and goat’s cheese. It is, indeed, a pristine island cloaked in a thicket of Mediterranean vegetation. The sea around here is teeming with fish and other aquatic creatures. The island’s two salty lakes, Veliko and Malo Jezero, are located on the north end of the island and are well-known. An historic Benedictine monastery may be found on the small St Mary’s Island in the midst of Veliko Jezero lake. Veliko and Malo Jezero, in addition to beach Saplunara (in the south of the island), are popular swimming places for both locals and visitors. The northwestern half of the island of Mljet is also a Croatian National Park, making it one of the most popular locations for visitors to this region of the country. The island provides frequent ferry links to Dubrovnik as well as a car ferry connection to the Croatian mainland’s Peljesac Peninsula.

Kolocep

Kolocep is one of three inhabited islands in the Elaphite Archipelago, which consists of thirteen islands. This island holds an unusual distinction: it is the Republic of Croatia’s southernmost inhabited island. Despite the fact that only about 200 people call it home, it’s a wonderful place to live. There are two main settlements on the island, Gornje celo and Donje celo, each at the opposite end of this picturesque island, so you will have plenty of space to yourself. The journey to Kolocep is reminiscent of a journey back in time, to a simpler and slower pace of life. Every walker’s dream because there are no cars, and the road on this Mediterranean gem is also car-free. Wander, explore, and discover the beautiful places of this Adriatic island. A short boat ride across the turquoise sea will transport you to a paradise island.

Zaton

Zaton is a little village nestled within a well-protected, picturesque bay about 8 kilometers north of Dubrovnik. Veliki Zaton and Mali Zaton are the two villages that make up the settlement. They are linked by a one-of-a-kind, multi-kilometer promenade. You can get there by bus from Dubrovnik; it takes about 20 minutes. Zaton is the ideal destination for anyone seeking a relaxing vacation away from the summer bustle and large hotels. Its relaxing setting, complete with stunning, unspoilt beaches and heavy pinewood shade, allows you to forget about the rest of the world, if only for a few moment.

General note: This route can be used only in good weather conditions. In bad weather conditions, you can correct the route on your own by using nautical maps and pilot books. In order to avoid heavy sea traffic which usually occurs on the official disembarkation days, we recommend you return to the base on the evening before, until 18:00 hours.

9. ROUTE: DUBROVNIK – SPLIT – 7 days

Route duration: 7 days

Route direction: middle to north

Detailed route descriptions available when clicking on the above image.

  • 1. day Check in Dubrovnik – Šipanska Luka (island Šipan) or Slano
  • 2. day Šipanska Luka (island Šipan) or Slano – Polače (island Mljet)
  • 3. day Polače (island Mljet) –Town Korčula (island Korčula) or Orebić (peninsula Pelješac)
  • 4. day Town Korčula (island Korčula) or Orebić (peninsula Pelješac) – Šćedro (island)
  • 5. day Šćedro (island) – Town Vis (island Vis)
  • 6. day Town Vis (island Vis) – Pakleni Islands (Aci Marina Hvar – Palmižana – island Hvar)
  • 7. day Pakleni Islands (Aci Marina Hvar – Palmižana – island Hvar) – Split
  • 8. day Check out Split

Dubrovnik

Dubrovnik is Croatia’s most popular tourist destination, and it’s easy to understand why. It’s a walled, sea-battered city at the foot of a grizzled mountain. Dubrovnik’s historic heart, which was primarily a medieval town reconstructed by Baroque planners following the earthquake of 1667, appears to have been suspended in time ever since. Set-piece churches and public buildings merge in perfectly with the green-shuttered stone houses, providing a magnificent ensemble that has escaped the ravages of time. Outside the city walls, Dubrovnik’s suburbs ooze Mediterranean elegance: gardens ablaze with vibrant bougainvillea and oleanders; trees laden with figs, lemons, oranges, and peaches.

Šipan

Sipan is most likely the Elaphites’ most peaceful and well-preserved island. This island is known for its beautiful, hidden beaches, winds that bring the aroma of medicinal herbs, majestic sunsets, and ancient ruins. Fishermen still cast nets at dawn and sell their catch to boaters and swimmers from the boat.  The ‘Island of Eagles,’ as Sipan is also known, was a favorite destination of the Dubrovnik aristocracy in the 16th and 17th centuries, according to the Latin word for eagle (gypana). On Sipan, several vineyards give place to enormous pines, branched olive trees, and ancient figs, and almonds and tomatoes flourish in abundance. Sipan is 17 kilometers or an hour and a half by boat from Dubrovnik, and a visit there is a must. Check the ipan ferry schedule, however be cautious during the winter months when ferries run less often and the last ferry’s departure time is rather changeable.

Slano

Slano is a small harbour in the same-named bay in southern Croatia. Dubrovnik lies 27 kilometers to the northwest. The prehistoric period (remains of a hill-fort and tumuli on surrounding hills) and ancient times (remains of a hill-fort and tumuli on neighboring hills) saw the area of Slano already occupied (a Roman castrum on the hill Gradina; early Christian sarcophagi, today exhibited in front of the Franciscan church). [2] Slano, previously the duke’s residence (duke’s palace, renovated at the end of the 19th century), came under the sovereignty of the Republic of Ragusa in 1399. The Ohmuevi family’s summer villa can be found nearby. A polyptych adorns the main altar of the current Franciscan church, which was built in the 16th century. In the Baroque period, the parish church of Saint Blaise, which dates from 1407, was restored. Banja is home to the Annunciation and St. Peter churches, both of which date from the 13th century. The primary vocations include farming, olive growing, viniculture, fruit growing, tobacco, herbs (sage, laurel), fishing, and tourism. Slano is located on the main coastal highway (M2, E65). Yachts can anchor in Banja cove, a small sheltered cove to the southwest of Cape Gornji, and larger yachts can anchor off the entrance to the cove.

Mljet

Mljet is the first big island encountered when travelling from south to north along the Croatian Adriatic. With its Mediterranean greenery, clear and pure sea, gently sandy shoreline, and plenty of underwater sea life, it is Croatia’s greenest island. The island is also considered to be one of Croatia’s most beautiful islands. Mljet is famous for its white and red wines, as well as olives and goat’s cheese. It is, indeed, a pristine island cloaked in a thicket of Mediterranean vegetation. The sea around here is teeming with fish and other aquatic creatures. The island’s two salty lakes, Veliko and Malo Jezero, are located on the north end of the island and are well-known. An historic Benedictine monastery may be found on the small St Mary’s Island in the midst of Veliko Jezero lake. Veliko and Malo Jezero, in addition to beach Saplunara (in the south of the island), are popular swimming places for both locals and visitors. The northwestern half of the island of Mljet is also a Croatian National Park, making it one of the most popular locations for visitors to this region of the country. The island provides frequent ferry links to Dubrovnik as well as a car ferry connection to the Croatian mainland’s Peljesac Peninsula.

Korcula

Korcula town has a reputation for being a place of ancient beauty, with beautiful beaches and a slew of swanky eateries. Korcula town, a medieval village brimming with rustic beauty, is a year-round destination. The palm-lined alleyways and historic surrounding walls sometimes draw comparisons to Dubrovnik, which is only a short distance away. It’s easy to understand why – Korcula town remains mostly unaffected by the throngs of tourists who go to the coastal metropolis during the summer months. All the more reason for locals and well-informed visitors to enjoy the laid-back, Mediterranean lifestyle.

Pelješac

Peljesac is the longest Dalmatian peninsula, deeply indented and mostly forested, with a coast dotted with beaches, reefs, bays, and fjords. Peljesac was inhabited in antiquity by Illyrians, Greeks, Romans, and, beginning in the seventh century, Slavs and Croats. It was known as Rathaneus Kersones, or the Cape of Lynx, by ancient historians. Peljesac is a peninsula of sailors and captains known for their skill and fearlessness on the high seas, with a century-old maritime tradition. It has long been known for its vineyards, and its varietal wines “Dinga” and “Postup” are well-known throughout the world. They are a unique experience with their picturesque locations on both sides of the coast in the greenery of olive, pine, and macchia. An asphalt road runs the length of the peninsula, connecting all settlements. One branch of the road leads to Trpanj, from which a ferry departs several times per day for Ploce and vice versa. The other branch leads to Orebic, and a ferry connects Peljesac to the island of Korcula.

Šćedro

Scedro is an Adriatic Sea island with an area of 8.36 km2 located 2.7 km (1.7 mi) off the south coast of the Croatian island of Hvar, opposite the municipality of Zavala. Because the island has two deep, well-protected coves, the name originates from Stedri, which means generous in old Slavonic. Scdro’s Latin name was Tauris, from which the Italian Tauricola or Torcola was derived. The island was communal property and reserved for use as a pasture, according to the Hvar Statute of 1331. The island is exceptionally productive, has a gentler climate than Hvar, and was even used to cultivate grain thanks to night dew. In the Bay of Mostir (1465), a Dominican monastery was founded, together with a sailor’s hospice, and was abandoned in the 18th century. Stare Stine has an old quarry, and gypsum from the island was used in the Hvar cathedral’s Baroque chapels. During the summer, the island is home to about 30 people. Except for restaurants and other tourist services during the summer season, the historic settlements of Mostir and Nastane are now mostly deserted.

Vis

The town of Vis is situated at the bottom of a well-protected harbour in the north-eastern corner of the island of Vis. It grew out of the old communities of Kut and Luka, which merged in the 16th century when the church Gospa od Spilica was built. With the demilitarisation of the island at the start of the Croatian war (1991-1995), tourism on Vis began to grow considerably. So it’s just been 15 years since the island and its town were both available to tourists. The Yugoslav Army’s stay is documented by the remains of military objects in the northwest and northeast parts of the Bay of Vis. Many visitors, particularly yachtsmen, are flocking to Vis in increasing numbers. Every moment, there are changes in lifestyle, but Vis has retained the old, irresistible Mediterranean charm and a life free of stress and trouble. The fortresses and stony piles attest to Vis’s thousand-year-old settlement, and the remains of a theatre built into the foundations of the Franciscan monastery on the peninsula Prirovo, antique therms, and the Hellenistic cemetery attest to Vis’s status as one of Croatia’s oldest urban centers. The growth of the economic activities of the people of Vis has been determined by natural conditions and tradition. Agriculture has long been the mainstay of the economy due to the abundance of cultivable and high-quality land, particularly in the regions surrounding Vis. Since antiquity, wine-growing has been the most important industry of the locals, as the writer Agatarhid explained, “how the grape from Issa, an island in the Adriatic sea, compares to others better.” The vast fishing grounds in this region of the Adriatic Sea, on the other hand, have influenced the development of fishing. Various sports activities are available in the town. A well-equipped sport and recreation center with four tennis courts, a basketball court, and a football field is available. In Vis, you can also join a sailing, cricket, or paragliding club. Outside of town, there are two diving centers where you can dive with other divers. Mountain climbing and bicycling are also options.

Pakleni otoci

The Paklinski islands are ‘anchored’ on the popular route between Split and Vis, and their 21 nautically appealing islands, islets, and cliffs that appear to be attached to the town of Hvar by an umbilical cord ensure a unique sea experience. Paklina is a sort of pine resin used in shipbuilding, and the islands are named after it. St. Clement is by far the largest island in this ‘hellishly’ magnificent sea sanctuary. Its southern sides are ornamented with various turquoise bays, while the ACI marina Palmiana provides a safe refuge on the north side of the island, and branching island trails connect them. Smaller islets can be found on both sides of the island, with Marinkovac and Jerolim to the east and Marinkovac and Jerolim to the west. The Paklinski islands, in particular, provide sailors with the widest choice of options. Whether you prefer tight ties or anchoring, wild nightlife or the sound of crickets, popular gastronomic destinations or family households, or simply want to raise your heart rate while exploring these green oases on your own strength, the Paklinski islands unquestionably ‘hide’ a paradise for anyone who enjoys yachting! ACI Marina Palmizana provides safe protection in all weather situations, particularly in the northwestern half of the marina. It is popular with boaters since it is ideally incorporated into the natural environment while also providing all of the required amenities of civilization, such as restrooms, a market, a restaurant, fast food, an ATM, and free Wi-Fi. This seasonally open port is often bustling, especially on days when large fleets of youthful boats visit. It’s a great place to start exploring the entire island.

Hvar

Hvar is an old city with a rich history on the same-named Croatian Adriatic Sea island. Hvar is proud to have the most sunny hours of any Adriatic Sea island. Many people describe Hvar as a lovely town because of its architecture, beautiful nature, and good weather. Hvar has a majestic piazza, widely regarded as the most beautiful of its kind in Dalmatia, dominated by St. Stephen’s Cathedral and bordered by Groda’s palaces and the cascading stone-built houses of Burag. Overall, Hvar straightaway presents itself as a monument, a jewel hidden by time. You can see the Fortica (Spanjola) fortress, the cathedral of Hvar, the Hvar theatre (founded in 1612), the arsenal, and the Franciscan monastery. Also, the nightlife in Hvar is what draws a large number of young people from all over the world.

General note: This route can be used only in good weather conditions. In bad weather conditions, you can correct the route on your own by using nautical maps and pilot books. In order to avoid heavy sea traffic which usually occurs on the official disembarkation days, we recommend you return to the base on the evening before, until 18:00 hours.

10. ROUTE: SPLIT – DUBROVNIK – 7 days

Route duration: 7 days

Route direction: middle to south

Detailed route descriptions available when clicking on the above image.

  • 1. day Check in Split – Milna (island Brač)
  • 2. day Milna (island Brač) – Pakleni Islands (Aci Marina Hvar – Palmižana – island Hvar)
  • 3. day Pakleni Islands (Palmižana – island Hvar) – Šćedro (island – for lunch) – Town Korčula (island Korčula) or Orebić (peninsula Pelješac)
  • 4. day Town Korčula (island Korčula) or Orebić (peninsula Pelješac) – Pomena (island Mljet)
  • 5. day Pomena (island Mljet) – Prožura (island Mljet)
  • 6. day Prožura (island Mljet) – Kobaš (peninsula Pelješac)
  • 7. day Kobaš (peninsula Pelješac) – Lopud (island) – Dubrovnik
  • 8. day Check out Dubrovnik

Split

Split has a long history, reaching back to the time when Roman Emperor Diocletian opted to build his palace on a peninsula near the famous Roman city of Salona, where he wished to spend his final years. During these 1700 years, the Palace gradually evolved into a city, which continues to entice visitors with its rich tradition, beautiful history, and natural and cultural heritage beauty. Since 1979, Diocletian Palace and the entire historical centre of Split have been listed on the UNESCO World Heritage List, not only because of the Palace’s exceptional preservation, but also because the Palace and its city (or the city and its Palace, if you prefer) continue to live a full life. In this edifice, all historical strata from ancient Rome through the Middle Ages are still visible and alive. A stroll through the ancient city transports you back in time, passing by magnificent examples of ancient architecture such as Peristyle, the middle-aged Romanesque Church, and Gothic Palace, Renaissance portals of noblemen’s houses, Baroque facades, and modern architecture superbly merged in the rich heritage. This division is replicated in Split’s daily life. Locals sit in the same cafes, restaurants, and shops as tourists, creating the sense that they have become a part of the city’s rhythm just by coming in Split. The vegetable and fish markets are the heart of every family’s existence in Split, just as the entire social life of this city of 200 thousand people is reflected on the Riva (waterfront), where every visitor should try to take his coffee alongside the city’s rowdy, temperamental residents. Split is much more than just beautiful architecture. Split is also home to excellent gourmet and wine experiences, as well as numerous cultural events such as film and theater festivals, exhibitions, excellent museums, and concerts. It is a city that offers a diverse range of entertainment options, from numerous clubs and bars to street festivals and events such as the Ultra Europe Festival, which attracts up to 100,000 young people from over a hundred countries each year. Only a few cities of similar size around the world can match Split’s sporting achievements, as it is home to a dozen Olympic medalists as well as other sports medalists. When you’ve had your fill of the city’s hustle and bustle, head to Marjan, the city’s icon, with its forest, jogging routes, mountain climbing and bicycling, recreational terrains, as well as the historic churches where Split’s late people found spiritual serenity. The several beaches with exceptionally clean sea, ranging from the well-known Bavice to the stone isolated oasis’ all surrounding Marjan, are also unique to find in a city the size of Split.

Milna

Milna is one of the Dalmatian coast’s most architecturally harmonious instances of Baroque urbanism. It is the great natural harbor on the island of Brac, and it served as a haven for the emperor’s fleet while the Diocletian’s Palace in Split was being built. Milna is located in a bay that divides into two sleeves – Zalo and Pantera. The harbor, which is located on the western side of the island of Bra, offers safety and protection from all winds, making it one of the safest recognized bays for charter boats throughout the summer season. It is a small town in the west of the island, about 18 kilometers from Supetar, the island’s main hub. It became to be the most significant port on the island of Brac, a position it retained for two centuries. Milna, with three state-of-the-art marinas and a bay overlooking the sea strait Splitska vrata, is sure to exceed the expectations of even the most discerning yachtsmen. It has a long and lovely promenade lined with stone houses that are masterpieces of traditional architecture. The town is dominated by a Baroque church with a typical Dalmatian belfry. The inside of the church is filled with outstanding Venetian artworks.

Pakleni otoci

The Paklinski islands are ‘anchored’ on the popular route between Split and Vis, and their 21 nautically appealing islands, islets, and cliffs that appear to be attached to the town of Hvar by an umbilical cord ensure a unique sea experience. Paklina is a sort of pine resin used in shipbuilding, and the islands are named after it. St. Clement is by far the largest island in this ‘hellishly’ magnificent sea sanctuary. Its southern sides are ornamented with various turquoise bays, while the ACI marina Palmiana provides a safe refuge on the north side of the island, and branching island trails connect them. Smaller islets can be found on both sides of the island, with Marinkovac and Jerolim to the east and Marinkovac and Jerolim to the west. The Paklinski islands, in particular, provide sailors with the widest choice of options. Whether you prefer tight ties or anchoring, wild nightlife or the sound of crickets, popular gastronomic destinations or family households, or simply want to raise your heart rate while exploring these green oases on your own strength, the Paklinski islands unquestionably ‘hide’ a paradise for anyone who enjoys yachting! ACI Marina Palmizana provides safe protection in all weather situations, particularly in the northwestern half of the marina. It is popular with boaters since it is ideally incorporated into the natural environment while also providing all of the required amenities of civilization, such as restrooms, a market, a restaurant, fast food, an ATM, and free Wi-Fi. This seasonally open port is often bustling, especially on days when large fleets of youthful boats visit. It’s a great place to start exploring the entire island.

Hvar

Hvar is an old city with a rich history on the same-named Croatian Adriatic Sea island. Hvar is proud to have the most sunny hours of any Adriatic Sea island. Many people describe Hvar as a lovely town because of its architecture, beautiful nature, and good weather. Hvar has a majestic piazza, widely regarded as the most beautiful of its kind in Dalmatia, dominated by St. Stephen’s Cathedral and bordered by Groda’s palaces and the cascading stone-built houses of Burag. Overall, Hvar straightaway presents itself as a monument, a jewel hidden by time. You can see the Fortica (Spanjola) fortress, the cathedral of Hvar, the Hvar theatre (founded in 1612), the arsenal, and the Franciscan monastery. Also, the nightlife in Hvar is what draws a large number of young people from all over the world.

Šćedro

Scedro is an Adriatic Sea island with an area of 8.36 km2 located 2.7 km (1.7 mi) off the south coast of the Croatian island of Hvar, opposite the municipality of Zavala. Because the island has two deep, well-protected coves, the name originates from Stedri, which means generous in old Slavonic. Scdro’s Latin name was Tauris, from which the Italian Tauricola or Torcola was derived. The island was communal property and reserved for use as a pasture, according to the Hvar Statute of 1331. The island is exceptionally productive, has a gentler climate than Hvar, and was even used to cultivate grain thanks to night dew. In the Bay of Mostir (1465), a Dominican monastery was founded, together with a sailor’s hospice, and was abandoned in the 18th century. Stare Stine has an old quarry, and gypsum from the island was used in the Hvar cathedral’s Baroque chapels. During the summer, the island is home to about 30 people. Except for restaurants and other tourist services during the summer season, the historic settlements of Mostir and Nastane are now mostly deserted.

Korcula

Korcula town has a reputation for being a place of ancient beauty, with beautiful beaches and a slew of swanky eateries. Korcula town, a medieval village brimming with rustic beauty, is a year-round destination. The palm-lined alleyways and historic surrounding walls sometimes draw comparisons to Dubrovnik, which is only a short distance away. It’s easy to understand why – Korcula town remains mostly unaffected by the throngs of tourists who go to the coastal metropolis during the summer months. All the more reason for locals and well-informed visitors to enjoy the laid-back, Mediterranean lifestyle.

Pelješac

Peljesac is the longest Dalmatian peninsula, deeply indented and mostly forested, with a coast dotted with beaches, reefs, bays, and fjords. Peljesac was inhabited in antiquity by Illyrians, Greeks, Romans, and, beginning in the seventh century, Slavs and Croats. It was known as Rathaneus Kersones, or the Cape of Lynx, by ancient historians. Peljesac is a peninsula of sailors and captains known for their skill and fearlessness on the high seas, with a century-old maritime tradition. It has long been known for its vineyards, and its varietal wines “Dinga” and “Postup” are well-known throughout the world. They are a unique experience with their picturesque locations on both sides of the coast in the greenery of olive, pine, and macchia. An asphalt road runs the length of the peninsula, connecting all settlements. One branch of the road leads to Trpanj, from which a ferry departs several times per day for Ploce and vice versa. The other branch leads to Orebic, and a ferry connects Peljesac to the island of Korcula.

Mljet

Mljet is the first big island encountered when travelling from south to north along the Croatian Adriatic. With its Mediterranean greenery, clear and pure sea, gently sandy shoreline, and plenty of underwater sea life, it is Croatia’s greenest island. The island is also considered to be one of Croatia’s most beautiful islands. Mljet is famous for its white and red wines, as well as olives and goat’s cheese. It is, indeed, a pristine island cloaked in a thicket of Mediterranean vegetation. The sea around here is teeming with fish and other aquatic creatures. The island’s two salty lakes, Veliko and Malo Jezero, are located on the north end of the island and are well-known. An historic Benedictine monastery may be found on the small St Mary’s Island in the midst of Veliko Jezero lake. Veliko and Malo Jezero, in addition to beach Saplunara (in the south of the island), are popular swimming places for both locals and visitors. The northwestern half of the island of Mljet is also a Croatian National Park, making it one of the most popular locations for visitors to this region of the country. The island provides frequent ferry links to Dubrovnik as well as a car ferry connection to the Croatian mainland’s Peljesac Peninsula.

Lopud

Lopud is a Croatian island that is part of the Elafiti archipelago, a series of islands off the coast of Dubrovnik known as Dubrovnik’s islands. The island, which is slightly over 7 nautical miles (approximately 14 kilometers) from Dubrovnik, has only a few hundred permanent residents. Lopud is one of the most popular islands to stay near Dubrovnik, with a daily ferry boat line connecting it to the city. The finest seasons to visit Lopud are in the spring and autumn. The months of June and September are the least popular with tourists, as compared to July and August, when the island is packed with families with children on vacation. The weather is even better than in July and August (milder temperatures), therefore hiking and other outdoor activities other than beach, swim, sunbath, and snorkeling are possible. The usual sea temperature is still around 22°C, which is perfect for open-water swimming.

This route can be used only in good weather conditions. In bad weather conditions, you can correct the route on your own by using nautical maps and pilot books. In order to avoid heavy sea traffic which usually occurs on the official disembarkation days, we recommend you return to the base on the evening before, until 18:00 hours. If your desired cruising route leads you towards Montenegrean waters, we advise you to inform your agent or us of those intentions. A second skipper/person with sailing licence is obligatory on board. For your convenience and safety, we will supply you with the neccesary procedures, costs and warnings.

11. ROUTE: DUBROVNIK – SPLIT – 14 days

Route duration: 14 days

Route direction: north

Detailed route descriptions available when clicking on the above image.

  • 1. day Check in Dubrovnik
  • 2. day Dubrovnik – Lopud – Šipanska Luka (island Šipan)
  • 3. day Šipanska Luka (island Šipan) – Polače (island Mljet)
  • 4. day Polače (island Mljet) – Lumbarda or Town Korčula (island Korčula)
  • 5. day Lumbarda or Town Korčula (island Korčula) – Zaklopatica (island Lastovo)
  • 6. day Zaklopatica (island Lastovo) – Vela Luka (Island Korčula)
  • 7. day Vela Luka (Island Korčula) – The Green Cave (island Ravnik) – Komiža (island Vis)
  • 8. day Komiža (island Vis) – Biševo (island) – Town Vis or Stončica bay (island Vis)
  • 9. day Town Vis or Stončica bay (island Vis) – Aci Marina Hvar (Palmižana – Pakleni Islands – island Hvar)
  • 10. day Aci Marina Hvar (Palmižana – Pakleni Islands) – anchorage Tiha (near Starigrad – island Hvar)
  • 11. day anchorage Tiha (near Starigrad – island Hvar) – Jelsa (island Hvar)
  • 12. day Jelsa (island Hvar) – Zlatni Rat (island Brač) – Uvala Lučice (island Brač – south)
  • 13. day Uvala Lučice (island Brač – south) – Maslinica (island Šolta)
  • 14. day Maslinica (island Šolta) – Krknjaši (island Veli Drvenik) – Split
  • 15. day Check out Split

Dubrovnik

Dubrovnik is Croatia’s most popular tourist destination, and it’s easy to understand why. It’s a walled, sea-battered city at the foot of a grizzled mountain. Dubrovnik’s historic heart, which was primarily a medieval town reconstructed by Baroque planners following the earthquake of 1667, appears to have been suspended in time ever since. Set-piece churches and public buildings merge in perfectly with the green-shuttered stone houses, providing a magnificent ensemble that has escaped the ravages of time. Outside the city walls, Dubrovnik’s suburbs ooze Mediterranean elegance: gardens ablaze with vibrant bougainvillea and oleanders; trees laden with figs, lemons, oranges, and peaches.

Lopud

Lopud is a Croatian island that is part of the Elafiti archipelago, a series of islands off the coast of Dubrovnik known as Dubrovnik’s islands. The island, which is slightly over 7 nautical miles (approximately 14 kilometers) from Dubrovnik, has only a few hundred permanent residents. Lopud is one of the most popular islands to stay near Dubrovnik, with a daily ferry boat line connecting it to the city. The finest seasons to visit Lopud are in the spring and autumn. The months of June and September are the least popular with tourists, as compared to July and August, when the island is packed with families with children on vacation. The weather is even better than in July and August (milder temperatures), therefore hiking and other outdoor activities other than beach, swim, sunbath, and snorkeling are possible. The usual sea temperature is still around 22°C, which is perfect for open-water swimming.

Šipan

Sipan is most likely the Elaphites’ most peaceful and well-preserved island. This island is known for its beautiful, hidden beaches, winds that bring the aroma of medicinal herbs, majestic sunsets, and ancient ruins. Fishermen still cast nets at dawn and sell their catch to boaters and swimmers from the boat.  The ‘Island of Eagles,’ as Sipan is also known, was a favorite destination of the Dubrovnik aristocracy in the 16th and 17th centuries, according to the Latin word for eagle (gypana). On Sipan, several vineyards give place to enormous pines, branched olive trees, and ancient figs, and almonds and tomatoes flourish in abundance. Sipan is 17 kilometers or an hour and a half by boat from Dubrovnik, and a visit there is a must. Check the ipan ferry schedule, however be cautious during the winter months when ferries run less often and the last ferry’s departure time is rather changeable.

Mljet

Mljet is the first big island encountered when travelling from south to north along the Croatian Adriatic. With its Mediterranean greenery, clear and pure sea, gently sandy shoreline, and plenty of underwater sea life, it is Croatia’s greenest island. The island is also considered to be one of Croatia’s most beautiful islands. Mljet is famous for its white and red wines, as well as olives and goat’s cheese. It is, indeed, a pristine island cloaked in a thicket of Mediterranean vegetation. The sea around here is teeming with fish and other aquatic creatures. The island’s two salty lakes, Veliko and Malo Jezero, are located on the north end of the island and are well-known. An historic Benedictine monastery may be found on the small St Mary’s Island in the midst of Veliko Jezero lake. Veliko and Malo Jezero, in addition to beach Saplunara (in the south of the island), are popular swimming places for both locals and visitors. The northwestern half of the island of Mljet is also a Croatian National Park, making it one of the most popular locations for visitors to this region of the country. The island provides frequent ferry links to Dubrovnik as well as a car ferry connection to the Croatian mainland’s Peljesac Peninsula.

Lumbarda

Lumbarda is a small fishermen’s village on the eastern end of the Croatian island of Korcula, a few kilometers from Korcula town. These two locations are connected by a road that runs through a beautiful landscape of pine trees and olive gardens. The settlement is surrounded by sandy vineyards, which produce the well-known white wine ‘Grk,’ which is made from local grapes. Vela Przina, Bilin Zal, and Tatinja are three of the most popular sandy beaches in the vicinity. The village also serves as a tourist destination. The majority of its 1200 residents are winegrowers, fishermen, and stonemasons who work in the local tourism business. It also has a long and illustrious history, with written records stretching back over two thousand years to Greek times. Lumbarda’s beaches are considered to be among the best on Korcula Island, and are ideal for children and families. Near the seaside, local travel agency and rental firms provide well-stocked water sports equipment, including windsurfing boards, paddleboards, sea kayaks, and boat rentals, to name a few.

Korcula

Korcula town has a reputation for being a place of ancient beauty, with beautiful beaches and a slew of swanky eateries. Korcula town, a medieval village brimming with rustic beauty, is a year-round destination. The palm-lined alleyways and historic surrounding walls sometimes draw comparisons to Dubrovnik, which is only a short distance away. It’s easy to understand why – Korcula town remains mostly unaffected by the throngs of tourists who go to the coastal metropolis during the summer months. All the more reason for locals and well-informed visitors to enjoy the laid-back, Mediterranean lifestyle.

Lastovo

With its 46 little islands, 46 churches and chapels, 46 vineyards, and surrounding sandbanks, it is a true paradise for nature lovers, sailors, food and wine connoisseurs, and tuna and other trophy fish anglers. Lastovo has reopened to tourists after a fifty-year hiatus. Aside from the natural beauty of the island, it is known for its carnival, in which all of the island people dress up in traditional costumes. The iconic Lastovo chimneys, which were previously status insignia of historic Lastovo households, are unique tourist attractions on the island. Ferries run regularly from Split, Dubrovnik, Mljet, and Korcula to Lastovo.

Vela Luka

Vela Luka is a small settlement on the western side of the island of Korula, nestled in a large bay. Numerous coves exist in Vela Luka Bay, which are surrounded by vineyards, olive gardens, fig trees, and pine trees. It’s is the largest town on the island, with a population of 4500 people. Also, it’s a safe anchorage and harbor for boats. Vela Luka is a popular tourist destination due to its moderate climate and natural splendors such as sweeping views, crystal clear seas, and lovely beaches. It also has a diverse cultural past, numerous sporting and entertainment events, and, most importantly, friendly and welcoming hosts.

Green cave

The Green Cave sits on the south-west side of Ravnik, a small, deserted island. It’s only a short distance from Vis Island, which is famous for providing a taste of the Mediterranean as it once was after being closed to the public for 40 years while serving as a major military installation. Because the Green Cave is frequently visited as part of private boat tours, you can also arrange stops at other locations. In the Green Cave, you’ll be able to swim and snorkel while taking in the beautiful emerald glow. You’ll be able to view that beam of light that reflects from the sea floor creating a stunning scene while submerged in this underwater realm, using snorkeling gear that’s normally provided on a tour. You may take beautiful images to share with your family and friends back home if you bring an underwater camera. The visibility is excellent, with schools of colorful fish frequently visible. You might even be able to plunge from the cave’s top into the alluring water below if you’re feeling very daring.

Komiža

Komiza is situated in a deep harbor on the western side of the island Vis, beneath the 600 meter high Hum mountain (1677 inhabitants according to the census from 2001). It is a typical Mediterranean community, with magnificent beaches and tiny streets and buildings crammed together around the harbor, attracting tourists. The moderate Mediterranean climate makes Komiza a lovely place to visit even in the winter. Gusarica, Nova posta, and Velo zalo are three gravel beaches with drinking water along the entire east shore of the Bay of Komiza. Komiza has always been proud of its fishing heritage, which is preserved in the Fisherman’s Museum, which is housed in the old Venetian tower on the promenade (riva), Croatia’s only one. In it are presented classic fishing tools. At the world exposition EXPO 1998 in Lisbon, a replica of the Komiza fishing boat gajeta falkusa highlighted Croatian maritime history. Every year on December 6th, during the feast of St. Nikola, the patron saint of travelers, seamen, and fishermen, a sacrificial boat is burned in front of the parish church of St. Nikola. Local culinary specialties (domestic bread-komiska pogaca, baked meals, grilled pilchards, beans and noodles in a fish stew-brodetto) are served alongside domestic wine. Traditional recipes would be impossible to envisage without these marine fruits. Parachute-sailing, horseback riding, nature walks, and diving are all options for adventurous vacationers. In the vicinity of Vis, there are 20 spots in the depths of the sea with sunken planes, sailing ships, submarines, and warships. Visit the Fisherman’s Museum and the music-dramatic manifestations of Komiza’s Cultural Summer, where you can hear klapa-songs from the taverns/konobas, if you’re interested in culture and enjoyment.

Biševo

Despite its proximity to the island of Vis, the island of Bisevo contains so much natural beauty in such a tiny space and is home to the world-famous Blue Cave. This natural wonder is now part of the Vis Park Archipelago, which is under the protection of UNESCO, which could ensure its long-term survival and development. Man has etched his mark on the island’s surface, and the famous Blue Cave, a classic dolomite-limestone formation, owes its existence to a human hand. Bisevo is an island on islands and a beautiful nautical zen-luka, thanks to the Blue and Medvidina Caves, Porat Bay and sandy beaches at the other end of the island, and generations of residents who cultivated the island scenery. Even if you know that there are five more caves on the island that are not accessible by boat, Bisevo takes on a mystical tone.

Vis

The town of Vis is situated at the bottom of a well-protected harbour in the north-eastern corner of the island of Vis. It grew out of the old communities of Kut and Luka, which merged in the 16th century when the church Gospa od Spilica was built. With the demilitarisation of the island at the start of the Croatian war (1991-1995), tourism on Vis began to grow considerably. So it’s just been 15 years since the island and its town were both available to tourists. The Yugoslav Army’s stay is documented by the remains of military objects in the northwest and northeast parts of the Bay of Vis. Many visitors, particularly yachtsmen, are flocking to Vis in increasing numbers. Every moment, there are changes in lifestyle, but Vis has retained the old, irresistible Mediterranean charm and a life free of stress and trouble. The fortresses and stony piles attest to Vis’s thousand-year-old settlement, and the remains of a theatre built into the foundations of the Franciscan monastery on the peninsula Prirovo, antique therms, and the Hellenistic cemetery attest to Vis’s status as one of Croatia’s oldest urban centers. The growth of the economic activities of the people of Vis has been determined by natural conditions and tradition. Agriculture has long been the mainstay of the economy due to the abundance of cultivable and high-quality land, particularly in the regions surrounding Vis. Since antiquity, wine-growing has been the most important industry of the locals, as the writer Agatarhid explained, “how the grape from Issa, an island in the Adriatic sea, compares to others better.” The vast fishing grounds in this region of the Adriatic Sea, on the other hand, have influenced the development of fishing. Various sports activities are available in the town. A well-equipped sport and recreation center with four tennis courts, a basketball court, and a football field is available. In Vis, you can also join a sailing, cricket, or paragliding club. Outside of town, there are two diving centers where you can dive with other divers. Mountain climbing and bicycling are also options.

Hvar

Hvar is an old city with a rich history on the same-named Croatian Adriatic Sea island. Hvar is proud to have the most sunny hours of any Adriatic Sea island. Many people describe Hvar as a lovely town because of its architecture, beautiful nature, and good weather. Hvar has a majestic piazza, widely regarded as the most beautiful of its kind in Dalmatia, dominated by St. Stephen’s Cathedral and bordered by Groda’s palaces and the cascading stone-built houses of Burag. Overall, Hvar straightaway presents itself as a monument, a jewel hidden by time. You can see the Fortica (Spanjola) fortress, the cathedral of Hvar, the Hvar theatre (founded in 1612), the arsenal, and the Franciscan monastery. Also, the nightlife in Hvar is what draws a large number of young people from all over the world.

Pakleni otoci

The Paklinski islands are ‘anchored’ on the popular route between Split and Vis, and their 21 nautically appealing islands, islets, and cliffs that appear to be attached to the town of Hvar by an umbilical cord ensure a unique sea experience. Paklina is a sort of pine resin used in shipbuilding, and the islands are named after it. St. Clement is by far the largest island in this ‘hellishly’ magnificent sea sanctuary. Its southern sides are ornamented with various turquoise bays, while the ACI marina Palmiana provides a safe refuge on the north side of the island, and branching island trails connect them. Smaller islets can be found on both sides of the island, with Marinkovac and Jerolim to the east and Marinkovac and Jerolim to the west. The Paklinski islands, in particular, provide sailors with the widest choice of options. Whether you prefer tight ties or anchoring, wild nightlife or the sound of crickets, popular gastronomic destinations or family households, or simply want to raise your heart rate while exploring these green oases on your own strength, the Paklinski islands unquestionably ‘hide’ a paradise for anyone who enjoys yachting! ACI Marina Palmizana provides safe protection in all weather situations, particularly in the northwestern half of the marina. It is popular with boaters since it is ideally incorporated into the natural environment while also providing all of the required amenities of civilization, such as restrooms, a market, a restaurant, fast food, an ATM, and free Wi-Fi. This seasonally open port is often bustling, especially on days when large fleets of youthful boats visit. It’s a great place to start exploring the entire island.

Stari Grad

Stari Grad is Croatia’s oldest town. Greek philoshoper Aristotel was born in Trakia in the same year that Greeks from the island of Paros in the Agean Sea landed on the island of Hvar and christened it Pharos. It is the island of Hvar’s historical heart. The town is set in a landscape where the vivid blue of the sea meets the green of the famous Pharos plain, which is dotted with vineyards and olive trees. The water gave protection and the crops provided nutrition. Both the fields and the water now contribute an appealing element to the island, where modern vacation sites have grown entwined with the town’s and island’s antiquities. Because of its central location on Hvar Island, Stari Grad has long been a safe haven for sailors, who have been greeted by town residents on the port promenade. The bay of Stari Grad is still frequented by most boat passengers going through middle Dalmatia. The village is surrounded by pine trees and is kept cool by summer breezes (maestral). It is one of the few Dalmatian sites where the air is pure and the sleep is soothing on hot summer days. The Town’s thousand-year history has left many monuments in the city’s urban framework.

Jelsa

Jelsa is located in the middle of Hvar Island, on the northern side of the island, by the sea. It is bordered on all sides by the tallest peaks on the island, including St. Nicholas on the west and Hum on the east. It features a lovely rough coastline with gorgeous tiny islands, bays, and capes, just like the rest of the island. Pine tree forests, vineyards, lavender farms, olive gardens, and a crystal clean coastline abound in Jelsa. There are also magnificent beaches there. They are accessible by foot, automobile, or boat. It’s interesting to note that Jelsa is barely 2 kilometers from the island’s sole genuine sandy beach. Jelsa is now a tourist destination with all the requisite tourist attractions such as cafés, restaurants, art galleries, and souvenir shops. Take a stroll through the town center to see the many churches, squares, municipal parks, and lapidary. The climate in this lovely little Mediterranean town is agreeable, with moderate winters and pleasant summers. The town plaza, known as Pjaca, is located right below the parish church and serves as the social hub. It’s a gathering spot for residents to share news, opine on current events, and even gossip. They are always delighted to share their comfortable atmosphere with their guests as nice hosts.

Zlatni rat (Bol)

Zlatni rat beach is one of the most beautiful beaches in the Mediterranean, and it is also one of the most unique beaches in the world due to its unique shape. Many world-famous business and travel magazines, including the New York Times, National Geographic, and Insider Travel, have featured it as one of the world’s most spectacular beaches in their articles. The elegance and allure of the Zlatni rat have made it a symbol of both the town of Bol and Croatia, and the Croatian government has designated it as a geomorphological monument. But it’s not just the shape that makes it so lovely and one-of-a-kind. It is surrounded by a crystal clear sea that changes color from turquoise to dark blue in just 10 to 20 meters, and it is bordered by decades-old pine trees that were planted by residents to provide natural shade. The beach is less than 2 kilometers from Bol and is connected to vea wonderful promenade shaded by pine trees, along which several more little beaches may be found. This intriguing 500-meter-long pebble beach has an unusual shape, like a little peninsula that reaches into the sea on both sides with about 900 meters of beach. The beach spans over 20.000 square meters and can accommodate over 10.000 people comfortably. The beach’s shape and position change depending on the wind, tide, and current, and the tip of the beach occasionally rotates so much that it forms a small pool. Mornings are usually windless, and the wind blows every afternoon, but one side of the beach always has calm water, making it ideal for families with small children.

Lučica

Lucice Bay is a favorite with sailors that cruise this stretch of the Brac coastline. The cove is divided into five sections, each of which provides enough wind protection. Aside from sailors, the cove is attractive to divers due to a cave in the western section of the lagoon. The sea in Lucice has an incredible sky-blue color that simply encourages guests to swim along the sandy floor and lush pine trees. Numerous summer cottages, apartments, and rooms are available for rent. Nearby restaurants serve Dalmatian specialties as well as a wide variety of fresh fish.

Maslinica

A lovely pine forest with secluded rocky beaches may be found on the bay’s south side. Maslinica is one of the most beautiful sites in the Adriatic, with an archipelago of seven islets (Polebrnjak, Saskinja, Stipanska, Kamik, Balkun, Rudula, and Grmej) in front of it. The historical, architectural, and environmental values of the old castle and attractive stone buildings are in perfect harmony with the grandeur of the surrounding landscape. The town grew up around the castle built by the Marchi noble family in 1708. Because of the frequent pirate raids, the Marchi brothers asked permission from the Venetian ruler to construct a fortress with a tower to protect the village. The originally modest fishermen’s settlement gradually expanded into a tourist and nautical center of the island after the castle was restored and a marina was built, receiving more and more tourists and repeat guests each year. A 300-year-old castle has been meticulously restored as a heritage hotel with individually designed luxury suites, a helideck, and a fine dining establishment. This is a fantastic tourist destination for those who enjoy nature, unspoiled beaches, and crystal clear waters, and it’s recently become increasingly popular with cyclists, rowers, yachtsmen, and divers, as well as recreational fishing and hunting enthusiasts. Adventuresome travelers will undoubtedly go on a jet-ski ride, while others who prefer to relax in the sun will visit the lovely pebble beach or travel to the neighboring Sipova Bay, where they will be pleasantly delighted to find the island’s sole sandy beach! Kayaking to one of the islets is also a wonderful option – the view of the adjacent bays, Trogir and Drvenik, from the Parish Church of St. Nicholas is pretty rewarding, but the vista of the sun setting behind the islets spread in the water like pearls is guaranteed to leave you speechless! Those who want to stay near the water can take advantage of the biking/hiking track that connects Maslinica with Donje Selo and Srednje Selo. You can also go to the adjacent eula Bay, which has a safe mooring spot due to its geographical location and heavily indented coastline. There, you can sample regional dishes for a one-of-a-kind dining experience. Maslinica got a national award in 2012 for the greatest tourist destination in the Adriatic with fewer than a thousand inhabitants, in recognition of its preserved natural beauty and tourist achievements, and again in 2017 for the best Authentic Coastal Destination!

Drvenik Veli

Drvenik Veliki is a small island off the coast of Dalmatia, about 8 nautical miles from Trogir. It covers a total area of 12.07 square kilometers. The island’s lone community, the near-eponymous village of Drvenik Veliki, has a population of 168 people, and it was first populated in the 15th century. The island is referred to as “Gerona” or “Giruan” in Croatian monuments from the 13th century. The coastline is rocky, with numerous bays and sandy and pebbly beaches. Beautiful bay Solinska is located on the island’s south side, while Krknjasi, also known as Blue Lagoon, is located on the island’s east side. There will be a lovely location to eat there with fresh sea cuisine or whatever else you desire. There are several apartments, a few restaurants, a bakery, and a small store in the ancient village. There are numerous beaches nearby, and the residents are warm and welcoming. Unspoiled nature, lovely beaches, and a tranquil setting are ideal for a quiet and private vacation. You’ll feel as if you’ve traveled back in time. It takes around an hour to travel to Trogir on the local boat line Jadrolinija. Every day, the boat travels from the Trogir and Seget Donji waterfronts towards Drvenik Mali and then returns to Trogir.

Split

Split has a long history, reaching back to the time when Roman Emperor Diocletian opted to build his palace on a peninsula near the famous Roman city of Salona, where he wished to spend his final years. During these 1700 years, the Palace gradually evolved into a city, which continues to entice visitors with its rich tradition, beautiful history, and natural and cultural heritage beauty. Since 1979, Diocletian Palace and the entire historical centre of Split have been listed on the UNESCO World Heritage List, not only because of the Palace’s exceptional preservation, but also because the Palace and its city (or the city and its Palace, if you prefer) continue to live a full life. In this edifice, all historical strata from ancient Rome through the Middle Ages are still visible and alive. A stroll through the ancient city transports you back in time, passing by magnificent examples of ancient architecture such as Peristyle, the middle-aged Romanesque Church, and Gothic Palace, Renaissance portals of noblemen’s houses, Baroque facades, and modern architecture superbly merged in the rich heritage. This division is replicated in Split’s daily life. Locals sit in the same cafes, restaurants, and shops as tourists, creating the sense that they have become a part of the city’s rhythm just by coming in Split. The vegetable and fish markets are the heart of every family’s existence in Split, just as the entire social life of this city of 200 thousand people is reflected on the Riva (waterfront), where every visitor should try to take his coffee alongside the city’s rowdy, temperamental residents. Split is much more than just beautiful architecture. Split is also home to excellent gourmet and wine experiences, as well as numerous cultural events such as film and theater festivals, exhibitions, excellent museums, and concerts. It is a city that offers a diverse range of entertainment options, from numerous clubs and bars to street festivals and events such as the Ultra Europe Festival, which attracts up to 100,000 young people from over a hundred countries each year. Only a few cities of similar size around the world can match Split’s sporting achievements, as it is home to a dozen Olympic medalists as well as other sports medalists. When you’ve had your fill of the city’s hustle and bustle, head to Marjan, the city’s icon, with its forest, jogging routes, mountain climbing and bicycling, recreational terrains, as well as the historic churches where Split’s late people found spiritual serenity. The several beaches with exceptionally clean sea, ranging from the well-known Bavice to the stone isolated oasis’ all surrounding Marjan, are also unique to find in a city the size of Split.

General note: This route can be used only in good weather conditions. In bad weather conditions, you can correct the route on your own by using nautical maps and pilot books. In order to avoid heavy sea traffic which usually occurs on the official disembarkation days, we recommend you return to the base on the evening before, until 18:00 hours.

12. ROUTE: SPLIT – DUBROVNIK – 14 days

Route duration: 14 days

Route direction: south

Detailed route descriptions available when clicking on the above image.

  • 1. day Check in Split
  • 2. day Split – Supetar (island Brač – north)
  • 3. day Supetar (island Brač – north) – Uvala Luke (sland Brač – north)
  • 4. day Uvala Luke (Brač – north) – Zlatni rat (island Brač) – anchorage Tiha (near Starigrad – island Hvar)
  • 5. day anchorage Tiha (near Starigrad – island Hvar) – Aci Marina Hvar (Palmižana – Pakleni Islands – Hvar)
  • 6. day Aci Marina Hvar (Palmižana – Pakleni Islands – island Hvar) – Komiža (island Vis)
  • 7. day Komiža (island Vis) – Blue Cave (island Biševo) – The Green Cave (island Ravnik) – Veli Budikovac
  • 8. day Veli Budikovac (island) – Vela Luka (Island Korčula)
  • 9. day Vela Luka (Island Korčula) – Zaklopatica (island Lastovo)
  • 10. day Zaklopatica (island Lastovo) – Lumbarda or Town Korčula (island Korčula)
  • 11. day Lumbarda or Town Korčula (island Korčula) – Pomena (Nature Park – island Mljet)
  • 12. day Pomena (Nature Park – island Mljet) – Okuklje (island Mljet)
  • 13. day Okuklje (island Mljet) – Kobaš (peninsula Pelješac)
  • 14. day Kobaš (peninsula Pelješac) – Lopud (island) – Dubrovnik
  • 15. day Check out Dubrovnik

Split

Split has a long history, reaching back to the time when Roman Emperor Diocletian opted to build his palace on a peninsula near the famous Roman city of Salona, where he wished to spend his final years. During these 1700 years, the Palace gradually evolved into a city, which continues to entice visitors with its rich tradition, beautiful history, and natural and cultural heritage beauty. Since 1979, Diocletian Palace and the entire historical centre of Split have been listed on the UNESCO World Heritage List, not only because of the Palace’s exceptional preservation, but also because the Palace and its city (or the city and its Palace, if you prefer) continue to live a full life. In this edifice, all historical strata from ancient Rome through the Middle Ages are still visible and alive. A stroll through the ancient city transports you back in time, passing by magnificent examples of ancient architecture such as Peristyle, the middle-aged Romanesque Church, and Gothic Palace, Renaissance portals of noblemen’s houses, Baroque facades, and modern architecture superbly merged in the rich heritage. This division is replicated in Split’s daily life. Locals sit in the same cafes, restaurants, and shops as tourists, creating the sense that they have become a part of the city’s rhythm just by coming in Split. The vegetable and fish markets are the heart of every family’s existence in Split, just as the entire social life of this city of 200 thousand people is reflected on the Riva (waterfront), where every visitor should try to take his coffee alongside the city’s rowdy, temperamental residents. Split is much more than just beautiful architecture. Split is also home to excellent gourmet and wine experiences, as well as numerous cultural events such as film and theater festivals, exhibitions, excellent museums, and concerts. It is a city that offers a diverse range of entertainment options, from numerous clubs and bars to street festivals and events such as the Ultra Europe Festival, which attracts up to 100,000 young people from over a hundred countries each year. Only a few cities of similar size around the world can match Split’s sporting achievements, as it is home to a dozen Olympic medalists as well as other sports medalists. When you’ve had your fill of the city’s hustle and bustle, head to Marjan, the city’s icon, with its forest, jogging routes, mountain climbing and bicycling, recreational terrains, as well as the historic churches where Split’s late people found spiritual serenity. The several beaches with exceptionally clean sea, ranging from the well-known Bavice to the stone isolated oasis’ all surrounding Marjan, are also unique to find in a city the size of Split.

Supetar

Supetar is the largest hamlet on the island of Bra, as well as its only town, and serves as the governmental, cultural, and unquestionably tourism hub. Supetar’s rich cultural and historical heritage will transport you back in time to the reign of Roman emperors, as evidenced by several villae rusticae and the ruins of mosaics near to the parish church from the 6th century. Supetar’s cobblestone streets and picturesque squares will give you a sense of the Dalmatian coastal town’s authentic spirit. Supetar is one of the most visited cities on the island of Brac, with a rich offer of quality accommodation provided by hotels, villas, holiday homes, and flats, as well as a range of catering and entertainment events held during the summer. Numerous restaurants and taverns will ensure that you sample the full range of Mediterranean flavors and smells, and a wide range of recreational options will ensure that your stay in Supetar is one to remember. Also, it is a perfect starting point for numerous planned excursions, whether you want to see local tourist spots on the mainland or sail on a day trip to the islands of Hvar or Vis.

Zlatni rat (Bol)

Zlatni rat beach is one of the most beautiful beaches in the Mediterranean, and it is also one of the most unique beaches in the world due to its unique shape. Many world-famous business and travel magazines, including the New York Times, National Geographic, and Insider Travel, have featured it as one of the world’s most spectacular beaches in their articles. The elegance and allure of the Zlatni rat have made it a symbol of both the town of Bol and Croatia, and the Croatian government has designated it as a geomorphological monument. But it’s not just the shape that makes it so lovely and one-of-a-kind. It is surrounded by a crystal clear sea that changes color from turquoise to dark blue in just 10 to 20 meters, and it is bordered by decades-old pine trees that were planted by residents to provide natural shade. The beach is less than 2 kilometers from Bol and is connected to vea wonderful promenade shaded by pine trees, along which several more little beaches may be found. This intriguing 500-meter-long pebble beach has an unusual shape, like a little peninsula that reaches into the sea on both sides with about 900 meters of beach. The beach spans over 20.000 square meters and can accommodate over 10.000 people comfortably. The beach’s shape and position change depending on the wind, tide, and current, and the tip of the beach occasionally rotates so much that it forms a small pool. Mornings are usually windless, and the wind blows every afternoon, but one side of the beach always has calm water, making it ideal for families with small children.

Stari Grad

Stari Grad is Croatia’s oldest town. Greek philoshoper Aristotel was born in Trakia in the same year that Greeks from the island of Paros in the Agean Sea landed on the island of Hvar and christened it Pharos. It is the island of Hvar’s historical heart. The town is set in a landscape where the vivid blue of the sea meets the green of the famous Pharos plain, which is dotted with vineyards and olive trees. The water gave protection and the crops provided nutrition. Both the fields and the water now contribute an appealing element to the island, where modern vacation sites have grown entwined with the town’s and island’s antiquities. Because of its central location on Hvar Island, Stari Grad has long been a safe haven for sailors, who have been greeted by town residents on the port promenade. The bay of Stari Grad is still frequented by most boat passengers going through middle Dalmatia. The village is surrounded by pine trees and is kept cool by summer breezes (maestral). It is one of the few Dalmatian sites where the air is pure and the sleep is soothing on hot summer days. The Town’s thousand-year history has left many monuments in the city’s urban framework.

Hvar

Hvar is an old city with a rich history on the same-named Croatian Adriatic Sea island. Hvar is proud to have the most sunny hours of any Adriatic Sea island. Many people describe Hvar as a lovely town because of its architecture, beautiful nature, and good weather. Hvar has a majestic piazza, widely regarded as the most beautiful of its kind in Dalmatia, dominated by St. Stephen’s Cathedral and bordered by Groda’s palaces and the cascading stone-built houses of Burag. Overall, Hvar straightaway presents itself as a monument, a jewel hidden by time. You can see the Fortica (Spanjola) fortress, the cathedral of Hvar, the Hvar theatre (founded in 1612), the arsenal, and the Franciscan monastery. Also, the nightlife in Hvar is what draws a large number of young people from all over the world.

Pakleni otoci

The Paklinski islands are ‘anchored’ on the popular route between Split and Vis, and their 21 nautically appealing islands, islets, and cliffs that appear to be attached to the town of Hvar by an umbilical cord ensure a unique sea experience. Paklina is a sort of pine resin used in shipbuilding, and the islands are named after it. St. Clement is by far the largest island in this ‘hellishly’ magnificent sea sanctuary. Its southern sides are ornamented with various turquoise bays, while the ACI marina Palmiana provides a safe refuge on the north side of the island, and branching island trails connect them. Smaller islets can be found on both sides of the island, with Marinkovac and Jerolim to the east and Marinkovac and Jerolim to the west. The Paklinski islands, in particular, provide sailors with the widest choice of options. Whether you prefer tight ties or anchoring, wild nightlife or the sound of crickets, popular gastronomic destinations or family households, or simply want to raise your heart rate while exploring these green oases on your own strength, the Paklinski islands unquestionably ‘hide’ a paradise for anyone who enjoys yachting! ACI Marina Palmizana provides safe protection in all weather situations, particularly in the northwestern half of the marina. It is popular with boaters since it is ideally incorporated into the natural environment while also providing all of the required amenities of civilization, such as restrooms, a market, a restaurant, fast food, an ATM, and free Wi-Fi. This seasonally open port is often bustling, especially on days when large fleets of youthful boats visit. It’s a great place to start exploring the entire island.

Komiža

Komiza is situated in a deep harbor on the western side of the island Vis, beneath the 600 meter high Hum mountain (1677 inhabitants according to the census from 2001). It is a typical Mediterranean community, with magnificent beaches and tiny streets and buildings crammed together around the harbor, attracting tourists. The moderate Mediterranean climate makes Komiza a lovely place to visit even in the winter. Gusarica, Nova posta, and Velo zalo are three gravel beaches with drinking water along the entire east shore of the Bay of Komiza. Komiza has always been proud of its fishing heritage, which is preserved in the Fisherman’s Museum, which is housed in the old Venetian tower on the promenade (riva), Croatia’s only one. In it are presented classic fishing tools. At the world exposition EXPO 1998 in Lisbon, a replica of the Komiza fishing boat gajeta falkusa highlighted Croatian maritime history. Every year on December 6th, during the feast of St. Nikola, the patron saint of travelers, seamen, and fishermen, a sacrificial boat is burned in front of the parish church of St. Nikola. Local culinary specialties (domestic bread-komiska pogaca, baked meals, grilled pilchards, beans and noodles in a fish stew-brodetto) are served alongside domestic wine. Traditional recipes would be impossible to envisage without these marine fruits. Parachute-sailing, horseback riding, nature walks, and diving are all options for adventurous vacationers. In the vicinity of Vis, there are 20 spots in the depths of the sea with sunken planes, sailing ships, submarines, and warships. Visit the Fisherman’s Museum and the music-dramatic manifestations of Komiza’s Cultural Summer, where you can hear klapa-songs from the taverns/konobas, if you’re interested in culture and enjoyment.

Blue Cave

The Blue Cave is a waterlogged sea cave in the Croatian Adriatic, located in a little bay named Balun (Ball in local dialect) on the east side of the island of Bisevo, about 4.5 nautical miles (8.3 kilometers) from Komiza. It is located 5 kilometers south-west of the island of Vis in the middle Dalmatian archipelago. The grotto is one of the Adriatic’s most well-known natural beauty places and a renowned show cave due to the shimmering blue light that shows at particular times of day. Because there was only one natural entrance below sea level, the cave was once only accessible by diving. In 1884, an artificial entrance large enough for small boats was erected based on his concept. The cave’s natural entrance, positioned on its southern side, is supposed to resemble a grotto’s vaulted ceiling. The sunlight enters the cave through this submarine-like entrance in the cave roof, creating an iridescent blue glowing effect all throughout the cave. In addition, a stone bar linking two cave walls is plainly visible just below the waterline in both above-water and underwater shots. The best time to visit the cave is between 11 a.m. and 12 p.m., depending on the season. The sunshine reflects through the water flowing from the cave’s white bottom, bathing the grotto in aquamarine light and making everything in the water appear silver. The cave was formed by the sea’s wave action, which eroded the limestone rock that makes up the entire island of Bievo. The cave itself is 24 meters long, 10–12 meters deep, and up to 15 meters high, with a 1.5-meter-high and 2.5-meter-wide entrance.

Green cave

The Green Cave sits on the south-west side of Ravnik, a small, deserted island. It’s only a short distance from Vis Island, which is famous for providing a taste of the Mediterranean as it once was after being closed to the public for 40 years while serving as a major military installation. Because the Green Cave is frequently visited as part of private boat tours, you can also arrange stops at other locations. In the Green Cave, you’ll be able to swim and snorkel while taking in the beautiful emerald glow. You’ll be able to view that beam of light that reflects from the sea floor creating a stunning scene while submerged in this underwater realm, using snorkeling gear that’s normally provided on a tour. You may take beautiful images to share with your family and friends back home if you bring an underwater camera. The visibility is excellent, with schools of colorful fish frequently visible. You might even be able to plunge from the cave’s top into the alluring water below if you’re feeling very daring.

Veliki Budikovac

Budikovac, an uninhabited island on the southeast side of Vis, just opposite the bay Bargujac, is presumably recognized to those who are familiar with Vis and its wonders. The only way to get to the two beaches worth visiting is via boat. Those who have decided to visit Vis will find a full selection of transportation options to the gorgeous island’s isolated beaches; all they need to do is go to the waterfront or the local tourism board. Budikovac is the name of the beach, which attracts visitors from all over the world year after year, and Perna, which is probably less well-known but equally gorgeous, is located in the northeast.

Vela Luka

Vela Luka is a small settlement on the western side of the island of Korula, nestled in a large bay. Numerous coves exist in Vela Luka Bay, which are surrounded by vineyards, olive gardens, fig trees, and pine trees. It’s is the largest town on the island, with a population of 4500 people. Also, it’s a safe anchorage and harbor for boats. Vela Luka is a popular tourist destination due to its moderate climate and natural splendors such as sweeping views, crystal clear seas, and lovely beaches. It also has a diverse cultural past, numerous sporting and entertainment events, and, most importantly, friendly and welcoming hosts.

Lastovo

With its 46 little islands, 46 churches and chapels, 46 vineyards, and surrounding sandbanks, it is a true paradise for nature lovers, sailors, food and wine connoisseurs, and tuna and other trophy fish anglers. Lastovo has reopened to tourists after a fifty-year hiatus. Aside from the natural beauty of the island, it is known for its carnival, in which all of the island people dress up in traditional costumes. The iconic Lastovo chimneys, which were previously status insignia of historic Lastovo households, are unique tourist attractions on the island. Ferries run regularly from Split, Dubrovnik, Mljet, and Korcula to Lastovo.

Lumbarda

Lumbarda is a small fishermen’s village on the eastern end of the Croatian island of Korcula, a few kilometers from Korcula town. These two locations are connected by a road that runs through a beautiful landscape of pine trees and olive gardens. The settlement is surrounded by sandy vineyards, which produce the well-known white wine ‘Grk,’ which is made from local grapes. Vela Przina, Bilin Zal, and Tatinja are three of the most popular sandy beaches in the vicinity. The village also serves as a tourist destination. The majority of its 1200 residents are winegrowers, fishermen, and stonemasons who work in the local tourism business. It also has a long and illustrious history, with written records stretching back over two thousand years to Greek times. Lumbarda’s beaches are considered to be among the best on Korcula Island, and are ideal for children and families. Near the seaside, local travel agency and rental firms provide well-stocked water sports equipment, including windsurfing boards, paddleboards, sea kayaks, and boat rentals, to name a few.

Korcula

Korcula town has a reputation for being a place of ancient beauty, with beautiful beaches and a slew of swanky eateries. Korcula town, a medieval village brimming with rustic beauty, is a year-round destination. The palm-lined alleyways and historic surrounding walls sometimes draw comparisons to Dubrovnik, which is only a short distance away. It’s easy to understand why – Korcula town remains mostly unaffected by the throngs of tourists who go to the coastal metropolis during the summer months. All the more reason for locals and well-informed visitors to enjoy the laid-back, Mediterranean lifestyle.

Mljet

Mljet is the first big island encountered when travelling from south to north along the Croatian Adriatic. With its Mediterranean greenery, clear and pure sea, gently sandy shoreline, and plenty of underwater sea life, it is Croatia’s greenest island. The island is also considered to be one of Croatia’s most beautiful islands. Mljet is famous for its white and red wines, as well as olives and goat’s cheese. It is, indeed, a pristine island cloaked in a thicket of Mediterranean vegetation. The sea around here is teeming with fish and other aquatic creatures. The island’s two salty lakes, Veliko and Malo Jezero, are located on the north end of the island and are well-known. An historic Benedictine monastery may be found on the small St Mary’s Island in the midst of Veliko Jezero lake. Veliko and Malo Jezero, in addition to beach Saplunara (in the south of the island), are popular swimming places for both locals and visitors. The northwestern half of the island of Mljet is also a Croatian National Park, making it one of the most popular locations for visitors to this region of the country. The island provides frequent ferry links to Dubrovnik as well as a car ferry connection to the Croatian mainland’s Peljesac Peninsula.

Pelješac

Peljesac is the longest Dalmatian peninsula, deeply indented and mostly forested, with a coast dotted with beaches, reefs, bays, and fjords. Peljesac was inhabited in antiquity by Illyrians, Greeks, Romans, and, beginning in the seventh century, Slavs and Croats. It was known as Rathaneus Kersones, or the Cape of Lynx, by ancient historians. Peljesac is a peninsula of sailors and captains known for their skill and fearlessness on the high seas, with a century-old maritime tradition. It has long been known for its vineyards, and its varietal wines “Dinga” and “Postup” are well-known throughout the world. They are a unique experience with their picturesque locations on both sides of the coast in the greenery of olive, pine, and macchia. An asphalt road runs the length of the peninsula, connecting all settlements. One branch of the road leads to Trpanj, from which a ferry departs several times per day for Ploce and vice versa. The other branch leads to Orebic, and a ferry connects Peljesac to the island of Korcula.

Lopud

Lopud is a Croatian island that is part of the Elafiti archipelago, a series of islands off the coast of Dubrovnik known as Dubrovnik’s islands. The island, which is slightly over 7 nautical miles (approximately 14 kilometers) from Dubrovnik, has only a few hundred permanent residents. Lopud is one of the most popular islands to stay near Dubrovnik, with a daily ferry boat line connecting it to the city. The finest seasons to visit Lopud are in the spring and autumn. The months of June and September are the least popular with tourists, as compared to July and August, when the island is packed with families with children on vacation. The weather is even better than in July and August (milder temperatures), therefore hiking and other outdoor activities other than beach, swim, sunbath, and snorkeling are possible. The usual sea temperature is still around 22°C, which is perfect for open-water swimming.

This route can be used only in good weather conditions. In bad weather conditions, you can correct the route on your own by using nautical maps and pilot books. In order to avoid heavy sea traffic which usually occurs on the official disembarkation days, we recommend you return to the base on the evening before, until 18:00 hours. If your desired cruising route leads you towards Montenegrean waters, we advise you to inform your agent or us of those intentions. A second skipper/person with sailing licence is obligatory on board. For your convenience and safety, we will supply you with the neccesary procedures, costs and warnings.